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BirminghamWeAre

A City for All

BirminghamWeAre is a community devoted to social value, providing a shared space for people who make a difference and together have a positive social impact across the City.

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Green open spaces
Displaying until 01 Sep 2021 - FreeTimePays
Featuring

Love our parks - get involved!

As Lockdown rules start to enable more people to enjoy their parks and green spaces, we all want to ensure that these wonderful places of natural beauty are protected for all to enjoy.  This community collective will share some of the brilliant initiatives running across the UK and show just how, together, we can make a difference for the benefit of all.  Connect with us.

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Love our parks - get involved!





As Lockdown rules start to enable more people to enjoy their parks and green spaces, we all want to ensure that these wonderful places of natural beauty are protected for all to enjoy.  This community collective will share some of the brilliant initiatives running across the UK and show just how, together, we can make a difference for the benefit of all.  Connect with us.


Over the next month and for the remainder of 2020, we will be growing our reach and pull together information and details on all the great work being carried out across communities as they collectively protect their parks.  

This will grow into a massive 'community-led' resource for people with a shared interest and passion for their local parks and green spaces.  

Here's just a few of the ideas and initiatives we will be telling you more about so we can share and get more people actively involved.

Litter picking groups - they do a fantastic job.  We'll connect you with your local group.

Art & Culture Trail.  We'll help you set up your trail and showcase your parks.

Walking clubs. We'll connect you and bring in more friends.

Park angels.  Volunteering with a difference.  We'll tell you more.

Creativity and green spaces collide.  Let's look at how art, music, photography and creativity in all its forms can help promote and protect our parks. 

Parks and mental health.  A walk, ride or jog in the park can do so much for your mental health.

There's something for everyone.

Connect with us and help us protect our parks. 

 

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
16 hours ago - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Langley Hall Park near Robin Hood Golf Club

When lockdown kicked in back in March 2020, the first daily walk I did was to Langley Hall Park. I noticed it on Google Maps and it looked like it was in walking distance. The park in Solihull is next to Robin Hood Golf Club. Main entrance on Swanswell Road. It is near Olton and Kineton Green in Solihull. Not far from the Birmingham border (Gospel Oak / Hall Green). Been two more times.

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Langley Hall Park near Robin Hood Golf Club





When lockdown kicked in back in March 2020, the first daily walk I did was to Langley Hall Park. I noticed it on Google Maps and it looked like it was in walking distance. The park in Solihull is next to Robin Hood Golf Club. Main entrance on Swanswell Road. It is near Olton and Kineton Green in Solihull. Not far from the Birmingham border (Gospel Oak / Hall Green). Been two more times.


Langley Hall Park

Welcome to Langley Hall Park. It is located in Olton, Solihull. Not far from Kineton Green. It is a small park with a pond and stream. There is paths that leads to the local schools. Suitable for walks, if you are walking from the roads / streets outside of the park then into the park. The main entrance gate is off Swanswell Road, which is linked to Langley Hall Road. This road goes to Gospel Lane, which takes you over the border in Birmingham (Gospel Oak / Hall Green). Acocks Green isn't that far away as well. The side paths leads to Reynalds Cross School, Langley School Specialist College and Langley Primary School. The road at the end leads to St Bernard's Road. You can't fail to notice Robin Hood Golf Club, which is to the south of the park on the other side of the fences.

 

My first walk to and then around Langley Hall Park was on the 24th March 2020, the day after the Prime Minister Boris Johnson told the whole nation that we are in lockdown. And you must stay at home. And if you go out, other than shopping or medical needs, to go for one form of daily exercise a day. I headed for Langley Hall Park, although for the majority of lockdown, I'm at home, more than going out for the odd daily exercise walk (e.g. creating a lot of Birmingham We Are posts).

Arriving at the park, the tree on the right had yellow leaves, not quite green. Enter through this gate.

Brilliant blue sunshine over an empty field.

Solihull M.B.C. Langley Hall Local Nature Reserve - typical Solihull park sign that you would also find in other parks in the Borough.

First look at the pond, the leaves had yet to grow back on the trees.

Saw an Egret in the pond.

This was the right hand side of the park. Or the south west corner towards Langley Hall Road.

This path goes past the fences near Robin Hood Golf Club.

This would be the south east corner of the park.

The path leading back to the main entrance.

A bench halfway to the next path.

And back to the main entrance / exit.

At the time was daffodils growing on the left.

This would be the entrance that I would use the most, even on my return visits.

Second visit was on the 11th April 2020. It was the Easter Bank Holiday Weekend and it was quite warm at the time. There wasn't that many people in the park at the time, just the odd other person. A look back at the main entrance. Only a couple of weeks on from my last visit, this tree was blooming already.

Went around the back of the pond this time around.

More trees around the back of the pond.

There is a bird house in the pond.

Many young families stop around the pond to look at the ducks or other wildlife.

Started to head down a path past the golf course and schools. Saw this robin on the fence before it flew away.

Only went down the path about halfway before turning back. I suspected that it might lead to St Bernard's Road. And as I didn't finish the path at the time, I wanted to go back.

Heading back, saw this blossom tree near Reynalds Cross School.

These are the trees close to the main entrance. The daffodils had finished flowering at this point.

As we left the park sign made a nice shadow with Langley Hall Park on the pavement.

For my third and most recent visit, I decided to get into the park a different way, on the 2nd July 2020. Walking into Solihull down Streetsbrook Road. I turned onto St Bernard's Road. When I saw a sign for Robin Hood Golf Club, I turned into the side road. Also at that end was Langley Primary School. Both venues seem to have reopened. Eventually the road gave way to a path between the golf course and the school grounds, and was back in the park.

Saw a lady coming from the path on the right.

I stuck to the path running alongside the golf course.

This lady was going for a run in the park.

I noticed that there was a lot of long grass growing, but some of the grass had been cut for social distancing purposes.

Getting near the path that runs alongside the stream.

Noticed a family was looking at a family of ducks, so I got this photo of the ducks.

The leaves on the trees around the pond were fully grown back.

Heading off the path near the pond and back to the path to the main entrance. More long grass to the right.

The leaves on the trees near the main entrance were really long by this point.

And back to the main entrance / exit gate. This time using it only the once, as I had come from the St Bernard's Road entrance. I think there is another path leading to Langley Hall Road, but I've not used that entrance yet.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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70 passion points
Construction & regeneration
03 Jul 2020 - Stephen Giles
Gallery

The Construction of Snow Hill Wharf - June 2020

Update! Fab movement at Snow Hill Wharf - the Gun Quarter’s newest development that will bring a much needed 420 apartments to the area.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣

Superb images once more from Stephen and Reiss - two guys who have been following SHW from the start. For a full June update, with renders and info regarding the development - hit the link below.

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The Construction of Snow Hill Wharf - June 2020





Update! Fab movement at Snow Hill Wharf - the Gun Quarter’s newest development that will bring a much needed 420 apartments to the area.⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣

Superb images once more from Stephen and Reiss - two guys who have been following SHW from the start. For a full June update, with renders and info regarding the development - hit the link below.


 
Artists Impression from GRID Architects/ Carey Jones Chapman Tolcher

There's been excellent progress on site since the site recommenced after lockdown. The main tower, which will rise to 21 storeys, is now presiding on its 11th floor.

Three of the four smaller blocks have now officially reached their full height and fabulous new feature roofs are being applied.

Brickwork also continues at a steady pace across the blocks.⁣

⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣LATEST IMAGES

Photos by Stephen Giles

June 17th:

Photos by Reiss Gordon-Henry

PLANS & RENDERS 

Brought forward by prominent developer, Berkeley Homes, Snow Hill Wharf will deliver five new buildings, with a 21-storey tower, comprising 420 one, two and three bedroom apartments; these will yield a total of 185 one, 215 two & 20 three bedrooms.

Snow Hill Wharf will facilitate three landscaped podium gardens and residents-only facilities, featuring a gymnasium, sauna, steam room, cinema and lounge. 143 car parking spaces are provided, including 5 EV, and space for 420 bicycles.

Artists Impressions from GRID Architects & Carey Jones Chapman Tolcher

Snow Hill Wharf is scheduled to complete in early 2022.

Words by Stephen Giles. Pictures by Stephen & Reiss Gordon-Henry

TWITTER: Buildsweare

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30 passion points
History & heritage
03 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Outside the main entrance of the Black Country Living Museum

We continue our digital tour of the Black Country Living Museum through my photos taken on a visit from August 2011 (almost 9 years ago). With a look at the buildings outside of the main entrance. The Rolfe Street Baths from Smethwick. Also a building from Wednesbury. A replica Titanic anchor was outside the museum back then. Also a Chassis Press.

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Outside the main entrance of the Black Country Living Museum





We continue our digital tour of the Black Country Living Museum through my photos taken on a visit from August 2011 (almost 9 years ago). With a look at the buildings outside of the main entrance. The Rolfe Street Baths from Smethwick. Also a building from Wednesbury. A replica Titanic anchor was outside the museum back then. Also a Chassis Press.


In this second digital tour of the Black Country Living Museum, we look at the buildings that were rebuilt at the main entrance of the museum, and now used as exhibition rooms. There was also a Chassis Press outside of the museum that you can see from Tipton Road in Dudley. During my visit of August 2011, there was also a replica Titanic anchor, based on one originally made by Hingley at Netherton in the Black Country (this is no longer there). It was made in 2010 for a Channel 4 documentary and was on loan to Dudley Council at the time.

Rolfe Street Baths, Smethwick

A look at the Rolfe Street Baths. Originally built on Rolfe Street in Smethwick in 1888. The building was a striking example of the Arts and Crafts movement of the period. The building closed down and was dismantled brick by brick in 1989. Later to be rebuilt at the Black Country Living Museum in 1999. The original architects was Harris, Martin & Harris of Birmingham. The baths was originally built by the Smethwick Local Board of Health to provide washing and recreational facilities. These days the building at the museum houses the Museum's reception and exhibition galleries.

In 2011 you could see the replica Titanic anchor outside of the Rolfe Street Baths (more on that further down the post).

What looks like a ghost sign painted on the side of the building reads:

ROLFE STREET

BATHS

FIRST BUILT IN SMETHWICK 1888

First look at the façade of the Rolfe Street Baths. It is a striking example of late 19th century architecture. It has ornamental brickwork and terracotta panels.

The terracotta panels has false gables on the façade depicting fish, herons and wildlife rarely seen in the industrial surroundings that the building was once in.

The building has decorative cast iron arches and columns which support the roof in the pool hall (best seen from the inside).

Remarkably the building had surviving being dismantled from Smethwick and re-erected here in Dudley. It's hard to tell that the building wasn't originally at this location.

The former entrances to the Female and Male baths. The building used to have 2 swimming pools with 28 slip baths, 2 showers and a munipical laundry.

These green doors are probablt no longer in use, but were retained for decorative use only. You can see some bricks that don't exactly match the originals. Perhaps some were broken or missing, and they had to use new bricks in the restoration at the museum.

Façade from a factory in Wednesbury

This was a façade from a building originally built as a factory in Wednesbury. It was moved to the museum by the West Midlands County Council Task Force. It was opened at the museum by H.R.H. The Duke of Gloucester on the 24th October 1985. Finance for the building was provided by Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council and the then West Midlands County Council (abolished in 1986). This is now the Pre-Paid Ticket Entrance. There is also a door for disabled or elderly people in wheelchairs to use. And they can get access to their coach nearby.

In the middle of this building was an anchor.

Inside was this plaque that was unveiled back in 1985 by the Duke of Gloucester.

The Titanic Anchor

Something you won't see on your visit to the museum now is this replica of The Titanic Anchor. It was made in 2010 by Sheffield Forgemasters International Ltd for a Channel 4 documentary. It was on loan at the time to the museum from Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council.

The original anchor was made by N. Hingley & Sons Ltd in 1911 at their factory in Netheron, Dudley. The original anchor weighed 15.5 tons.

In 2011 the Titanic anchor replica was seen outside of the Black Country Living Museum near the former Rolfe Street Baths building. But it was eventually moved to a more permenant location in Netherton where it remains today.

One of the museum volunteers seen in period costume close to the main entrance of the museum, not far from the Titanic Anchor replica. The anchor is now lying face down in Netherton.

Wilkins & Mitchell Chassis Press

Probably the first thing you would see when arriving at the museum on Tipton Road would be this Chassis Press. The  Wilkins & Mitchell Chassis Press was built in 1913 for Rubery Owen Ltd based in Darlaston at the time. It was erected and maintained by The Hulbert Group of Dudley. Wilkins and Mitchell Limited was established in 1904 in Darlaston. They produced machine tools and presses. Their machines could be found in factories all around the world. The Chassis Press here was in use until 1970. It's possible that it could have been installed at the museum site from 1978, or in the 1980s.

A close up look at the Chassis Press. Four gear wheels at the back and two large gear wheels at the front.

There was so many gear wheels here that used to turn when it use. You can also see a smaller gear wheel in front of the larger ones.

It's now just a monument that you would see as you arrive or leave the Black Country Living Museum. A reminder of how successful it was when in use from 1913 to 1970 in Darlaston.

Side view of the Chassis Press with the gear wheels.

On this side you can see four gear wheels at the bottom.

Clearly this wheel used to drive the gear wheels.

One last look at the Chassis Press before getting back in our coach and returning to Birmingham,

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
03 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

The Bandstand and Drinking Fountains at Lightwoods Park

It wasn't just Lightwoods House that was restored in Lightwoods Park. Other historic monuments were restored including the bandstand and two drinking fountains. They look as good as new now. In this post we will look at them from before restoration, during restoration and what they are like after restoration. A new Rest House was built in 2016-17.

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The Bandstand and Drinking Fountains at Lightwoods Park





It wasn't just Lightwoods House that was restored in Lightwoods Park. Other historic monuments were restored including the bandstand and two drinking fountains. They look as good as new now. In this post we will look at them from before restoration, during restoration and what they are like after restoration. A new Rest House was built in 2016-17.


Bandstand

The Bandstand at Lightwoods Park is Grade II listed and dates to the late 19th century. In an Octagonal plan. It was made of Cast Iron on a brick base with a sheet iron roof. The Bandstand was presented to the City of Birmingham by Rowland Mason Esq. J.P. of West Mount, Edgbaston. It was erected in April 1903. It is now in the care of Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council (since they took over the running of the park from Birmingham City Council in November 2010). The Bandstand was restored between 2016 and 2017.

The first time I saw the Bandstand in Lightwoods Park was in March 2011. So it was about 4 months after Sandwell took over the running of the park from Birmingham. It would be another 5 years before restoration work began on it (same time as Lightwoods House).

There was scaffolding all over the Bandstand at Lightwoods Park during January 2016. Also some hoardings, so couldn't get too close to it at the time.

In September 2016, restoration of the Bandstand in Lightwoods Park was almost complete. But was still barriers around it at the time.

The Bandstand in November 2017 after restoration was completed.

At the beginning of June 2020 I was back at Lightwoods Park for a lockdown walk around the park. Saw a man doing press ups to the left of the Bandstand.

Drinking Fountain

There is at least two drinking fountains in Lightwoods Park. There is one near Lightwoods House, that was given to the City of Birmingham, by Sydney Edwards of Moorfield Beech Lanes, on behalf of the Subscribers in December 1903. The other drinking fountain is near the entrance to the second half of the park from Galton Road. Both are of an identical design. There is a third drinking fountain of this design in Warley Woods.

I originally saw the first drinking fountain when I first visited Lightwoods Park in March 2011. And it was in a state of disrepair. It was about 4 months after Sandwell took over the running of the park from Birmingham. It would be another 5 years before Sandwell Council started to work on restoring it, and the other drinking fountains.

Scaffolding around the drinking fountain close to Lightwoods House during January 2016. The old tiles on the roof had been removed. There was also hoardings around the area as Lightwoods House was also being fully restored at the time.

I first found the second drinking fountain, near the Galton Road entrance during September 2016, when I walked around the rest of the park for the first time. You could see the tiles in the original colour, and it was missing the tip that was added after the restoration was completed.

The second drinking fountain near the Galton Road entrance to the second half of Lightwoods Park, seen during early June 2020. We were heading to the Warley Woods from here. There is a quote on here (a bit unreadble) from William Shakespeare's Timon of Athens Act I, Scene II.

Those healths will make thee and thy state
look ill, Timon. Here's that which is too weak to
be a sinner, honest water, which ne'er left man i' the mire

In comparison to the two Lightwoods Park drinking fountains, a look at the drinking fountain in the nearby Warley Woods. It was made in 1906-07, and was restored in 2009.

The first time I saw the Warley Woods drinking fountain was during July 2017, while I was on the Big Sleuth bear hunt. Bentley the Bearwood Bear was close by (it is now outside of Lightwoods House).

The Warley Woods drinking fountain seen during early June 2020 on a full lockdown walk around the woods.

Rest House

I first saw The Rest House in November 2017, not far from Bearwood Bus Station. It looks relatively new. But the roof looked like it was from the 1900s. It had benches around a central area with noticeboards. It's possible that they reused the roof from another building. It was a completely new build. 

The Rest House seen in early June 2020, as I was looking towards a view towards Bearwood Bus Station. There used to be a section in the middle with benches and notice boards, but it seems to have been removed due to vandalism. 

I'll probably next cover the Shakespeare Garden at Lightwoods House. So watch this space!

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points

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