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Open spaces
3 hours ago - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Calthorpe Park: the park named after the Calthorpe Family

You have probably heard of the Calthorpe Estates which manages the land and what can be built in Edgbaston. They gave their name to Calthorpe Park which opened on the Pershore Road in Edgbaston in 1857. The park is between Speedwell Road and Edward Road. The River Rea is to the back of the park. The statue of Robert Peel used to be here, but just the plinth survives here now.

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Calthorpe Park: the park named after the Calthorpe Family





You have probably heard of the Calthorpe Estates which manages the land and what can be built in Edgbaston. They gave their name to Calthorpe Park which opened on the Pershore Road in Edgbaston in 1857. The park is between Speedwell Road and Edward Road. The River Rea is to the back of the park. The statue of Robert Peel used to be here, but just the plinth survives here now.


First up the information taken from the Wikipedia page: Calthorpe Park.

The park opened in 1857 on the Pershore Road in Edgbaston. The parks name comes from the Calthorpe family whose Frederick Gough, 4th Baron Calthorpe  provided the land for it's creation in 1857. His son Augustus Gough-Calthorpe, 6th Baron Calthorpe signed over the freehold of the land in 1894. The park was formally opened by Prince George, Duke of Cambridge on the 1st June 1857.

An 1855 statue of Robert Peel used to stand in the park, but all that remains here is the original plinth. The statue was moved further down the Pershore Road to outside of Tally Ho! (now the West Midlands Police Training HQ).

 

December 2010

I've not been into Calthorpe Park much with my camera, but the first time was during December 2010.

A look at the empty plinth that used to have the statue of Robert Peel above it.  Like many old statues / plinths this plinth had graffiti on it (at the time) and the pair of L's were damaged. (You should see the old plinths at the Birmingham Museums Collection Centre for more examples).

The statue of Robert Peel seen in front of Tally Ho! on the Pershore Road in Edgbaston during November 2009 (it is still at this location). The statue used to be on Congreve Street, then it was moved to Council House Square in 1873 (now Victoria Square). In 1926 a gas lamp knocked it off it's pedestal (it was hit by a lorry) and it was moved to Calthorpe Park. In 1963 the statue was moved to the Pershore Road on top of a new plinth, leaving the old plinth where it was. The Victorian Society had opened to move the plinth and statue to a suitable location in the city centre, but that never happened. The statue was erected to commemorate the Repeal of the Corn Laws and not his involvement in setting up the Metropolitan Police.

Trees in Calthorpe Park seen from the Pershore Road side. There is football pitches behind with many goalposts.

One of the paths and a line of trees.

Looking back to the Pershore Road. Towards Birmingham Central Synagogue (the 1960s building was demolished in 2013 when the congreation moved into their refurbished building on Speedwell Road). That is now the site of a retirement home (Gracewell of Edgbaston).

The paths were looking a bit tired in late 2010. Edward Road seen to the far right.

I think the paths have been done up in the following years.

A plant close to the Pershore Road. The gatehouse lodge to the left on the corner of Speedwell Road.

From the Pershore Road looking at the path in the middle.

Close up look at the gatehouse. I don't think anyone has lived there in decades.

This column used to have council advertising around it. Now it is bare, but has plants growing out the top of it.

October 2019

I returned to Calthorpe Park with my camera while the Great Birmingham Run was on, up the Pershore Road. Trees looking very autumnal and the paths looking as good as new.

The tree lined path to the centre of the park (well heading along the path towards Speedwell Road / Alexandra Road).

Now near Speedwell Road. There are bollards close to here which separates Speedwell Road from Alexandra Road, as well as Princess Road in the middle.

The path alongside Alexandra Road leads to a bridge over the River Rea.

One of the goalposts on the football fields as well as a view of Edgbaston Cricket Ground with it's floodlights. The cricket stadium was redeveloped in 2011.

Looking to a spire in Moseley. It is of St Anne's Church, which is located on Park Hill in Moseley. Below a small brick building with graffiti all over it.

Looking to the football field with Edgbaston Cricket Ground in the distance.

Some of my photos from the Great Birmingham Run 2019 on the Pershore Road in Edgbaston. For more photos follow this link Great Birmingham Run 2019: runners on the Pershore Road in Edgbaston.

This is close to the corner of Edward Road and Pershore Road (where I entered the park this time around).

The runners continue to head up the Pershore Road and back into the city centre. Heading past Gracewell of Edgbaston and the Edgbaston Dental Centre.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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60 passion points
Construction & regeneration
16 hours ago - Stephen Giles
Gallery

The Construction of 103 Colmore Row - October 2019

Significant progress has been made on the lower steel structure for 103 Colmore Row with the vertical setbacks now clearly visible on the Newhall Street side of the build and the large overhang at street level visible on Colmore Row.

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The Construction of 103 Colmore Row - October 2019





Significant progress has been made on the lower steel structure for 103 Colmore Row with the vertical setbacks now clearly visible on the Newhall Street side of the build and the large overhang at street level visible on Colmore Row.


Artist Impression from Doone Silver Kerr Architects

New to this update on the progress at 103 Colmore Row is the installation of four new 20 metre tall columns overlooking Colmore Row.

Weighing up to 20 tonnes, the structure will soon form the entrance to the new winter garden, the main architectural feature of the new development, as seen in the above render.

LATEST PHOTOGRAPHY TAKEN 14 - 20 OCTOBER:

Photos by Daniel Sturley

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30 passion points
Construction & regeneration
16 hours ago - Stephen Giles
Gallery

The Construction of The Mercian - October 2019

The construction of the podium at The Mercian on Broad Street is now well advanced, with concrete pouring commencing across the site. Both cores are progressing well and are almost ready for lift off. A cladding sample has also appeared on site. Exciting times!

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The Construction of The Mercian - October 2019





The construction of the podium at The Mercian on Broad Street is now well advanced, with concrete pouring commencing across the site. Both cores are progressing well and are almost ready for lift off. A cladding sample has also appeared on site. Exciting times!


The main core will comprise of three lifts, a goods lift, refuse chute and a stairwell. This will provide direct access to floor 42.

A secondary core is also going up, as seen behind the main one. This will provide two additional lifts and provide access up to level 14, where the development will see a shoulder extension.

PHOTO UPDATE OF THE MERCIAN (14 - 20 OCTOBER 2019)

Photos by Daniel Sturley

A cladding sample is now taking pride of place on site.

Photo by Alan Webb

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30 passion points
Open spaces
21 Oct 2019 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Malvern and Brueton Parks: from Solihull Town Centre to the M42

Two parks in one that are in Solihull Town Centre. Well Malvern Park is closer to the shops in Solihull. While Brueton Park is closer to the M42 (not far from the A41 and Junction 5). Over the years I've been to Malvern Park multiple times. Brueton Park only twice (it is much further away from the centre). Lots of paths to walk, also a lake and the River Blythe in Brueton Park.

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Malvern and Brueton Parks: from Solihull Town Centre to the M42





Two parks in one that are in Solihull Town Centre. Well Malvern Park is closer to the shops in Solihull. While Brueton Park is closer to the M42 (not far from the A41 and Junction 5). Over the years I've been to Malvern Park multiple times. Brueton Park only twice (it is much further away from the centre). Lots of paths to walk, also a lake and the River Blythe in Brueton Park.


First up details from the Wikipedia page Malvern and Brueton Park.

This pair of parks is located in Solihull.The park is over 130 acres in size and opened in 1944. The parks are a Green Flag Award winner.

Malvern Park was laid out by the then Solihull Urban District Council in 1926, on land that was formerly part of the estate of Malvern Hall. The Statue of Horse and Horse Tamer was sculpted in 1874 by Sir Joseph Edgar Boehm. It was purchased at auction by Captain Oliver Bird, of Bird's Custard for his garden at Tudor Grange, but he donated it to Solihull Council in 1945. It was placed in the park during the coronation year of 1953. The statue was damaged in 2012, and restored later that year.

Brueton Park is a Local Nature Reserve. The parkland was given to Solihull by Horace Brueton in 1944. This land was also formerly part of the estate of Malvern Hall. The two parks were linked in 1963. A lake runs through the park near the River Blythe. There is many species of Oak trees in the park. It is hard to tell when you are leaving Malvern Park as you enter Brueton Park as they merge into one.

 

I'm not putting all the photos I've uploaded into this post, please see them in the gallery. Alternatively in my Flickr albums Malvern Park and Brueton Park.

Malvern Park

The Prancing Horse statue seen during January 2010. This was when the bronze was looking quite green and before metal thieves damaged it in 2012 (before it was later restored).

The gates into Malvern Park. Seen in the middle of January 2010. They are the main gates from New Road in Solihull Town Centre. And not  far from the Warwick Road. They date to 1954-55.

Saw this wooden frame not far from the playground in the park during December 2012. A few years later I saw that they had installed a rope that children could climb on and walk along, like something from an obstacle course.

Near the New Road gate entrance. Saw this plaque in December 2012. From the "Rotary Club of Solihull. Presented to the people of Solihull in celebration of the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, 2012, Sixty Glorious years". It was donated by Earlswood Garden & Landscape Centre and was made of mid Wales stone.

A path in Malvern Park seen during February 2014. Sometimes the pedestrian and cylist paintwork on the path can become quite faint, so sometimes you maybe walking on the cyclists side.

This canopy seen in Malvern Park during October 2014. Some kind of gazebo. Possibly somewhere that a band could play music, not that I've ever seen that myself here.

This wooden walkway seen in March 2016, going off the path to the right.

Ice cream van in the car park seen during March 2017. Super Whippy. I usually take the entrance from Park Road as it is the closest entrance from the Solihull High Street.

There was a lot of snow in the park during December 2017. A Winter Wonderland. This view looking to the spire of St Alphege's Church. It was freezing!

Mr Blue Sky was in Malvern Park during January 2019. Looking this way to the tennis courts.

The main gates to the park if you are coming in from the Park Road entrance. But there is also a path to the right. The October 2019 visit which I took on the walk to Brueton Park again. These gates date to the opening of the park in 1926.

Brueton Park

I've only been into Brueton Park twice. The first time was during October 2018. That time I walked all the way to the Warwick Road and then back into Solihull Town Centre. The Second time in October 2019 to cross a footbridge over the M42 (on a rather long walk to Widney Manor Station).

The path that leads from Malvern Park into Brueton Park.

Here the paths diverge, but you can really only go right past the evergreen trees. This is near the Warwickshire Wildlife Trust (I've been past them but not gone in).

The lake in Brueton Park. It is quite large and runs along side the River Blythe.

A swan in the Brueton Park Lake.

Some gulls standing on branches of a tree, near the lake.

Heading into Brueton Park during October 2019 and the leaves on the trees are going yellowy orange. Quite autumnal.

This time I took the right path around the lake heading to a footbridge that crossed the River Blythe.

Here the Brueton Park Lake flows into the River Blythe. I was on my way to cross that footbridge.

Following the path alongside the River Blythe. The lake is on the other sides of the trees to the left.

Another footbridge crossing the River Blythe in Brueton Park. A quick look before I left the park for the footbridge over the M42.

Not only is it possible to walk from Solihull Town Centre over the M42, but you could probably also walk to Knowle and Dorridge if you wanted to. The Warwick Road is cut in half by the motorway. So the Solihull Bypass replaces that section of the A41. The footbridge can only be used by pedestrians, dog walkers and cyclists (while they are not riding there bikes). I took a route towards Widney Manor Station.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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60 passion points
Transport
21 Oct 2019 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Southdown and Bath Bus Company buses at the Great Birmingham Run 2019

Walking up the Edgbaston Road to check out a bit of the Great Birmingham Run. Had to give up the idea of going into Cannon Hill Park, and the Cricket Ground was quiet. Anyway saw this pair of buses at the Pershore Road junction as runners went past up the Pershore Road.

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Southdown and Bath Bus Company buses at the Great Birmingham Run 2019





Walking up the Edgbaston Road to check out a bit of the Great Birmingham Run. Had to give up the idea of going into Cannon Hill Park, and the Cricket Ground was quiet. Anyway saw this pair of buses at the Pershore Road junction as runners went past up the Pershore Road.


I was expecting runners to be coming out of Cannon Hill Park and around Edgbaston Cricket Ground, but Great Run had to cancel that. So Edgbaston Road was a bit quiet while it was completely closed from the Willows Road / Russell Road end.

Saw this pair of open top buses at the Edgbaston Road / Pershore Road junction.

Bath Bus Company with the Alzheimer's Society.

Southdown with the Birmingham Children's Hospital Charity.

People were cheering on the runners from the top deck of each bus. I headed right next up Pershore Road and went as far as Calthorpe Park before I left the runners behind.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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