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Green open spaces
08 Sep 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Kings Norton Park on the August Bank Holiday Monday

My first walk around Kings Norton Park in many years. This was after visiting West Heath Park for the first time. More people in Kings Norton Park. Kids in the playground / play area, also at the Skate Park. Was also a group of cyclists who I later saw ride past Kings Norton Junction (via the Recreation Ground). Was nice to be back.

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Kings Norton Park on the August Bank Holiday Monday





My first walk around Kings Norton Park in many years. This was after visiting West Heath Park for the first time. More people in Kings Norton Park. Kids in the playground / play area, also at the Skate Park. Was also a group of cyclists who I later saw ride past Kings Norton Junction (via the Recreation Ground). Was nice to be back.


Kings Norton Park

Previous Kings Norton Park post here: Kings Norton Park down the Pershore Road South.

After the walk around West Heath Park, there was time in the morning for another park walk, so next we headed to Kings Norton Park. It's been years since I've last walked around it (at least once). Other than skimming it down the Pershore Road South, Camp Lane or Westhill Road. This time went around the field towards the Skate Park. Briefly left the park for the Kings Norton Recreation Ground and Kings Norton Junction (where the Stratford-on-Avon Canal meets the Worcester & Birmingham Canal). Before later walking back to the park. Earlier in the park I noticed a group of cyclists meeting up. Eight of them later rode through the Recreation Ground towards the canal junction, and I had to wait until they all went past me. Both green spaces are on the Rea Valley Route and National Cycle Network route 5. It was the August Bank Holiday Monday on the 31st August 2020.

 

Starting with crossing this footbridge over a stream (it's not the River Rea). Just at the end of the Shrub Garden.

Saw this NAF (Northfield Arts Forum) sign about Domesday. The art of a stylised letter 'D' was painted by Thelma Coulson.

Looking back at the Shrub Garden towards the playground / play area and car park.

Into the field, and I noticed a lot of kids playing on the Skate Park ramps.

No paths around here so you have to walk over the grass.

The clouds were looking a bit grey, maybe a sign of later rain?

Kids on skateboards, scooters and possibly bikes. Not seen it this busy before.

Just the field and trees.

There was that group of cyclists meeting in Kings Norton Park. They later rode out towards Kings Norton Junction and beyond.

Sign on the Pershore Road South says that Kings Norton Park has been a public park since 1924.

Later heading back into the park after the walk to and from Kings Norton Junction.

The bridge crosses a small stream.

Towards the trees to social distance from people walking their dog.

Saw this sign about the Kings Norton Park Civic Garden.

The Civic Garden leads towards the Pershore Road South entrance. The park exists thanks to the Birmingham Civic Society when they purchased the land in 1920.

Another NAF sign, this time about the Grammar School. Suffragists mid-protest. Painting by Jenny McClaren.

On the footpath in the tree covered canopy. This leads towards Westhill Road.

Looking out over the field towards the playground / play area.

The path continues on to the steps to Westhill Road. This time I left at the end of the path and walked back towards the car park.

A wide open field with trees.

There was more kids playing at this play area, but only a limited number allowed at one time.

There is a small hill with a slide, and a couple of swings.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
08 Sep 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Return to the Warley Woods in June 2020

At the beginning of June 2020, we had a walk around Lightwoods Park which continued into the Warley Woods. This time I had a full walk around the woods. Even passed the Visitor Centre (it reopened in late May 2020). But plenty of people out getting their daily exercise. Or looking for those rainbow doors. The golf course was open again as well.

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Return to the Warley Woods in June 2020





At the beginning of June 2020, we had a walk around Lightwoods Park which continued into the Warley Woods. This time I had a full walk around the woods. Even passed the Visitor Centre (it reopened in late May 2020). But plenty of people out getting their daily exercise. Or looking for those rainbow doors. The golf course was open again as well.


Warley Woods

Previous posts from the Warley Woods:

 

Heading up a path from Lightwoods Park towards Lightwoods Hill. We entered the Warley Woods for the next part of this walk. It was early June 2020. First was a walk around the woods going in a anti-clockwise direction. Then crossing through the large open field. After that following the perimeter paths around the golf course (which was open again and members were playing golf once more). There was also some sculptures to see in the woods and I also found the Visitor Centre.

 

First view of the Warley Woods this time from Lightwoods Hill before entering the gate.

Proceeding to walk in the woods off the paths.

Tall trees everywhere.

Back onto the path.

The wide open field. People were either sitting on the grass or having fun.

The gates to the Abbey Road entrance.

Some sculpted wood that looked like sarcophagus's.

Now onto the path that goes around the golf course.

A pair of yellow flags on the Warley Woods Golf Course.

By early June some lockdown restrictions had been eased, this probably included playing golf.

Later saw this Sidewinder lawnmower.

The Visitor Centre near the car park. Both of which are near Lightwoods Hill.

A bench near the golf course, which was close to the Visitor Centre.

The Visitor Centre and shop were reopened on the 21st May 2020.

One last walk into the woods to see some sculptures.

There was these carved stone sculptures to see in the Warley Woods.

Also this area with picnic benches. There was bear sculptures to the back, maybe it was a crazy golf course for kids?

Another set of sculptures, more like carved wooden sculptures.

Another look at the drinking fountain.

Back on the path walking to the exit.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

 

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60 passion points
History & heritage
07 Sep 2020 - FreeTimePays
Did you know?

J.R.R. Tolkien and Perrott's Folly

Whilst living in Edgbaston the young J.R.R. Tolkien would have been very familiar with two distinctive local landmarks. The extraordinary 96ft (30m) Perrott’s Folly is named after John Perrott who had it built in 1758. The crenelated gothick tower was originally part of a hunting lodge. In the 19th century it became one of the first weather recording stations in the country.

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J.R.R. Tolkien and Perrott's Folly





Whilst living in Edgbaston the young J.R.R. Tolkien would have been very familiar with two distinctive local landmarks. The extraordinary 96ft (30m) Perrott’s Folly is named after John Perrott who had it built in 1758. The crenelated gothick tower was originally part of a hunting lodge. In the 19th century it became one of the first weather recording stations in the country.


The pair (Edgbaston Waterworks Tower) are said to have suggested Minas Morgul and Minas Tirith, the Two Towers of Gondor, after which the second volume of The Lord of the Rings is named.

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40 passion points
History & heritage
07 Sep 2020 - FreeTimePays
Did you know?

J.R.R. Tolkien and The Edgbaston Waterworks Tower

Along the road at Edgbaston Waterworks stands a later Victorian chimney tower. The tower was part of a complex of buildings designed by J H Chamberlain and William Martin around 1870. The pair (Perrotts Folly) are said to have suggested Minas Morgul and Minas Tirith, the Two Towers of Gondor, after which the second volume of The Lord of the Rings is named.

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40 passion points
History & heritage
07 Sep 2020 - FreeTimePays
Did you know?

J.R.R. Tolkien and The Plough and Harrow Hotel

 In 1913, aged 21, and whilst still at Exeter College in Oxford, Tolkien re-established contact with Edith and their romance was rekindled. They were married in the Spring of 1916 in Warwick and in June of that year spent a night in Birmingham at the Plough & Harrow Hotel. here is a blue plaque here, which was presented by the Tolkien Society in 1997.

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