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Transport
07 Oct 2019 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

The Usual Suspects at the Tyseley Locomotive Works open day (September 2019)

I went to my 3rd open day at the Tyseley Locomotive Works on Saturday 28th September 2019. Mostly the same steam and diesel locomotives plus some special guests. The turntable was closed, so they opened up a different path from the car park to the engine repair shed at the back. Bought my ticket online and had a QR code in the E-ticket. Plus got a handstamp (not that I came back).

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The Usual Suspects at the Tyseley Locomotive Works open day (September 2019)





I went to my 3rd open day at the Tyseley Locomotive Works on Saturday 28th September 2019. Mostly the same steam and diesel locomotives plus some special guests. The turntable was closed, so they opened up a different path from the car park to the engine repair shed at the back. Bought my ticket online and had a QR code in the E-ticket. Plus got a handstamp (not that I came back).


Seen at Tyseley Warwick Road. This steam locomotive was stationary with the buffet cars behind. GWR 4073 Class 5080 Defiant. Built in May 1939 at the Swindon Works. GWR Castle Class. Standard Gauge Steam Trust (now the Tyseley Locomotive Works) bought it in 1974. Restored in 1988.

LMS Jubilee Class 5593 Kolhapur outside of the engine repair shed. Built in 1934 at the Glasgow Works. Bought in 1968 by the Standard Gauge Steam Trust. Restored in the 1980s.

GWR 4073 Class 5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe in the engine shed next to 7760. Built in 1936 at the GWR Swindon Works. Sold to the then Birmingham Railway Museum in 1973. Restored between 1998 and 2008.

7760 in the engine repair shed next to 5043. GWR 0-6-0 PT 57xx Class. Built in 1931. Awaiting an overhaul.

GWR 4900 Class 4965 Rood Ashton Hall outside of the engine shed to the back. Regularly used as the Shakespeare Express. Previously named 4983 Albert Hall. Rebuilt in 1962 using parts from both original engines Albert Hall and Rood Ashton Hall. Had an overhaul in 2008 to 2009.

GWR 4073 Class 7029 Clun Castle was in front of 4965 Rood Ashton Hall. Built in 1950 at the ex Great Western Railway Swindon Works for the Western Region of British Railways after Nationalisation. Withdrawn in 1965. Bought in 1966 by Patrick Whitehouse, the ownership then passed to 7029 Clun Castle Ltd. Now based at the Tyseley Locomotive Works. First restoration in the mid 1980s. Mostly recently fully restored by 2017 before returning to service.

9600. GWR 0-6-0 PT 57xx Class. Built in 1945. Seen outside just behind guest locomotive 34053 Sir Keith Park. The turntable was fenced off behind.

Special guest locomotive. SR Battle of Britain class 21C153 Sir Keith Park. 34053 Sir Keith Park steaming away. Built at the Brighton Works in 1947. Withdrawn from service in 1965. In 1979 purchased by Charles Timms but didn't leave Barry Island until 1984. Later sold to Dr John F Kennedy in 1992 and moved to Crewe. Currently owned by Southern Locomotives Limited. Last restored in 2012. Original intended home was Swanage Railway but is now usually at the Severn Valley Railway. I last saw her on the back of a lorry in December 2018 heading to the Tyseley Locomtive Works on the Warwick Road in Tyseley. See that post here Not something you see every day: a steam locomotive on the back of a lorry!

Another special guest. A diesel locomotive 20189. Class 20 built sometime between 1957 and 1968, it's an diesel-electric locomotive. Also called L189. Currently owned by Class 20189 Ltd. Behind was London Transport 20142 Sir John Betjeman (I didn't get full views of that one). Also owned by Class 20189 Ltd. It used to be used on the London Underground on the Metropolitan line.

When I was briefly there on the Saturday the 28th September 2019, they had a pair of diesel locomotives taking passengers in the carriages up and down the line from the platforms at Tyseley Warwick Road.

At the back was D1755 / 47773. Class 47 built in 1964. Used to be used with the Royal Train. Named The Queen Mother. Now owned by Vintage Trains. It was previously used with The Polar Express around December 2018.

At the front was 13029. Original number was 08021. Class 08. Built in 1953. Has a British Railways badge on the side.

D1755 and 13029 seen heading up and down the line with the passengers in the carriages. Behind 13029 was a Pullman carriage. As usual, I found lots of photographers waiting for their shots as far as you could walk on site. This is usually as far as I can go before heading back into the engine shed and up and down the stairs to the exit.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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60 passion points
Environment & green action
07 Oct 2019 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Aston Hall and Park in autumn and winter

A look around Aston Park, the home of Aston Hall. The estate of Sir Thomas Holte in the 17th century. Later home to James Watt Jr. The park in the winter of January 2010 and December 2016. The autumn of September 2017. The park is also quite close to Villa Park, home of Aston Villa FC.

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Aston Hall and Park in autumn and winter





A look around Aston Park, the home of Aston Hall. The estate of Sir Thomas Holte in the 17th century. Later home to James Watt Jr. The park in the winter of January 2010 and December 2016. The autumn of September 2017. The park is also quite close to Villa Park, home of Aston Villa FC.


Aston Park is located on the Trinity Road in Aston, and is mainly known for Aston Hall at the centre of the park. Not far away is Villa Park, home of Aston Villa Football Club. The park is reachable on foot from both Witton Station and Aston Station. As well as various local bus routes.

I first travelled to Aston by bus in January 2010, getting off at the Six Ways Island near the Birchfield Road. At the time there was a lot of snow in the area. My full Flickr album: Aston Hall and Park.

January 2010

Approaching Aston Park from the Trinity Road, already I could see that the grounds were all covered in snow. The North Lodge and Stables were visible in the background.

Now heading up the main road into the park, with so much snow, I couldn't see where the road or the grass was! The stable block is the entrance to Aston Hall, but as it was winter (January 2010) it was closed.

First look at Aston Hall in this winter scene from January 2010. It is a Grade I listed building designed by John Thorpe and built between 1618 and 1635, for Sir Thomas Holte. A Jacobean mansion, the house was bought in 1864 by the Birmingham Corporation, becoming the first historic country house to pass into municipal ownership. It is still owned by Birmingham City Council, but is now run as museum by the Birmingham Museums Trust.

The North Lodge and stables. Also a Grade I listed building as the Stable Range to North of Northern Lodge, Aston Hall. Dates to the middle of the 18th century. The entrance to the courtyard is through the gatewat in the middle of the former stabels range.

Turning around (I think this was still near the stables range) looking at the snow covered Aston Park. I was heading back down to Trinity Road, where I would then have a look around Villa Park. This was the only time I saw Aston Park with snow, and since then, I've not seen the park with snow.

December 2016

A walk that started at Dartmouth Middleway ended at Aston Park. I went up Chester Street towards Park Circus (was some sculptures to see along the way). Headed into the park via Frederick Road near this playground. By the looks of the map, I missed seeing King Edward VI Aston School.

A look at Lady Holte's Garden at Aston Hall through the gate. I would have to wait until September 2017, during Birmingham Heritage Week, before having a good explore of this garden.

Another view of Lady Holte's Garden during winter 2016/17. Completely empty as the hall is always closed during winter. It's normally open from Easter to the end of October.

A path in the park near Witton Lane. It might have been winter, but looked very autumnal at the time with the leaves on the ground.

One of the paths that runs alongside Trinity Road. No snow, so the main road up to the hall was clear to see. An Aston Hall sign with opening times. My next visit to the park would be around 9 months later when I heard about the Civil War Siege event during Birmingham Heritage Week. After I left the park, I walked to Aston Station to get a train back into Birmingham City Centre (wasn't going to walk back).

September 2017

Follow this link on the Civil War Siege, which was the main reason at the time for going back to Aston Park.

A look around Lady Holte's Garden. This water feature at the time was dry, maybe there is water in here in the summer? A fountain in the shape of a cross.

The far left side of Lady Holte's Garden. Plenty of trees and flowers to see in the middle of September 2017. The side of Aston Hall. During the Civil War Siege, I had time to explore the inside of the hall, before it go too busy.

I noticed that a cricket match was underway in Aston Park, at the same time as the Civil War Siege event (not related in any way). So around Aston Hall were Civil War re-enactors. And down on the cricket pitch, cricketers!

The back of Aston Hall, many flower beds with yellow and orange coloured flowers. The Pan sculpture in the middle. It has been missing it's head for many years now. There was also stone vases by famous Birmingham sculptor William Bloye.

A path round the back of Aston Park. After the Civil War Siege, had a look around the gardens, before heading down this path towards Trinity Road, and heading back to Aston Station.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

 

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60 passion points
Construction & regeneration
04 Oct 2019 - Stephen Giles
News & Updates

100 Broad Street - a new 61 storey addition planned for the Broad Street cluster

Birmingham is a city experiencing huge change. In the City's Westside, we are calling it the 'Broad Street Cluster' with some massive skyscrapers either planned or already under construction.

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100 Broad Street - a new 61 storey addition planned for the Broad Street cluster





Birmingham is a city experiencing huge change. In the City's Westside, we are calling it the 'Broad Street Cluster' with some massive skyscrapers either planned or already under construction.


A new 61-storey skyscraper is the next big building on the horizon for Broad Street after plans were revealed recently.

100 Broad Street, brought forward by Yardley-based, Euro Property Investments, will comprise 503 one-and two-bedroom apartments, with a 60th floor Sky Lounge, amenities and commercial units.

Located at the junction of Broad Street and Ryland Street, Centennial House, a disused office building owned by the applicant, will need to be demolished.

Rising to a mammoth 193 metres (633 feet), it's been designed by Jewellery Quarter-based practice, Glancy Nicholls Architects.

Birmingham City Council Planning Officers have intimated that a significant landmark building will be supported on site, subject to design, as the site lies within a location designated for taller ambitions.

No parking provision will be allocated, given that the Midland Metro Tram will service the area in 2021. Secure storage for 250 bikes will be made available instead.

While the design has been inspired by other talls, this proposal is unique for Birmingham - and crucially, it seems the numbers add up!

It's the tallest proposal the city has ever seen, and one which should set a precedent and inspire a new generation of tall buildings and architecture within the city centre.

As pointed out above, the Metro Tram will service the area, an extension that is already paying dividends to the regeneration, not only on Broad Street, but throughout the city, with its cleaner air and vastly improved accessibility.

It supports population and economic growth by linking jobs and people.

It also has the opportunity to perhaps kickstart the first phase of Ladywood's wider redevelopment plan due in the next few years.

With other developments coming forward, all linked via a tram route, the city should become an even more exciting place to live.

THE BUILDING

The building comprises an initial 55 storeys of apartments, with the rest earmarked for amenity, dining & commercial units.

The building will no doubt provide an attractive proposition for those wanting to live in the city.

Indeed, demand for city-centre housing is soaring; roared on by young professionals, and those who fancy a change of lifestyle.

The mix of units will see 224 one and 279 two-bedrooms, with all units available for sale on the open market, with accommodation sizes varying from 55.6 sqm to 80.8 sqm.

THE PAVILION

A two-storey (11m) pavilion will be incorporated into the rear of the site.

With a green roof proposed, it's been designed in a way to respond sympathetically to the nearby housing stock of Ryland Street.

A plethora of amenity offerings will be on offer here, including a gym, work space areas, games room, cinema, and a residents’ lounge with roof terrace – the latter will be accessed through a glazed link bridge.

A designated cycle storage area will be located here and will span both levels.

The materials will, like the tower, be made with an unitised facade system, mixing transparent and opaque panels.

ACTIVE FRONTAGES

The ground floor will boast a triple height lobby that'll be occupied by two commercial units (5,500 sqft) with mezzanine levels. Their entrances will be wholly independent to the residential aspect (see below).

Crucial really, as not only will they complement similar other uses along Broad Street, but they will also offer active frontages that will see the building blend into its surroundings, and enhance the vibrant street furthermore.

'THE CROWN'

Located on the 58th-60th floors lies the jewel in the crown (no pun intended) - the 'Sky Lounge'.

It'll be a publicly accessible bar and restaurant space, with the architect already promoting it as the largest highest-altitude dining experience anywhere in the country.

Gas masks at the ready!

It’ll be accessible from the ground floor lift, right up to the 58th entrance lobby, with the 59th floor offering a full-height bar & the 60th providing space for public and private dining.

EXTERNAL LIGHTING

Birmingham City Council's 'High Places SPD (2003)' requires that tall buildings should be lit by well-designed lighting schemes, and should add to the skyline of the city.

Given that the main pedestrian footpath leads onto a main arterial route, the path will be naturally be illuminated via street lighting, with the added hues of nearby entertainment venues.

The main entrance will be uplit with LED luminaires.

No building mounted feature lighting is currently proposed, but this is subject to change.

Due to the height, an aviation warning lights strategy will also need to be developed in conjunction with Birmingham Airport - a consultee in pre-planning talks.

All external lighting will be dimmable and controllable via photocell and time scheduling.

At the very top, the crown will be illuminated to a low level of ambient lighting which will emit through the open sides.

FACADE

The facade has been inspired by existing builds within the city and others further afield. Each facet of the design has taken a subtle nod from each.

A unitised facade system with titanium frames will take pride of place here, mixing transparent and opaque frosted glass panels. It'll ooze simpleness.

No openable windows are forecast, so the architects have once again incorporated a slot ventilation system into their proposal.

The system allows fresh air in, and fresh air to go out. It will be incorporated into the spandrel panels on the glazing, which have been meticulously designed to minimise the impact on the facade.

Historically, the site was once a well-known brass-works, so the architects will emphasise this with a slim linear articulation design that references the filigree patterns often found in brass-working. 

LANDSCAPING

The site lies immediately adjacent to the proposed ‘Five Ways’ Midland Metro tram
stop - seen below.

Many new trees will be planted and a high-quality public realm implemented, which will, once complete, respond positively to the stop, whilst integrating the scheme into its surroundings.

Eight or so new trees are proposed along the front of the building along Broad Street, with further trees within the external seating area, and off Ryland Street.

EVOLUTION OF THE SCHEME

Through pre-planning discussions, 100 Broad Street has evolved from three buildings, with a pinnacle 40 storey tower, to a 61-storey landmark skyscraper.

The massing of the tower now responds to the relationship between the existing buildings along Broad Street.

It's more simple in form, has more of an impact, with both masses sliding against each other, thus giving the development a more slender appearance - as seen below.

You'll notice that the positioning of the tower has also been delicately positioned. This is to give some enclosure to the adjacent houses on Ryland Street, whilst giving Broad Street an exclusive frontage.

DEMOLITION

All glitzy stuff, but before any of this can materialise, Charter & Centennial House, 34,000 sqft of disused office space, owned by the applicant, will need to be demolished.

All buildings and structures falling within the site have been credited as having no significant heritage value.

Images from Euro Property Investments

SO, WHO ARE EURO PROPERTY INVESTMENTS?

Euro Property Investments Ltd (Epil) operate an extensive property portfolio, with a wide range of glamorous projects undertaken within the UAE and beyond.

On U.K. shores, they've extensive experience in re-purposing and redeveloping sites in urban areas. Within Brum, the company are currently renovating Louisa Ryland House, on Newhall Street, for WeWork.

They are armed to the teeth with affluent Middle Eastern investors, but how this will translate back to the U.K. market and into the regions is anyone's guess.

Given Birmingham's unprecedented investment and construction records, will EPIL's investors make that seamless transition into the U.K. market? Only time will tell.

WHAT NEXT?

The building will go to planning committee soon, possibly towards the end of 2019, with demolition commencing in 2020, before construction in 2021, with a 2024 completion.

Given the exhaustive pre-planning process, this should fly through with approval.

The development will also be subject to a Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) sum of over £3.7 million that will be put towards improving key infrastructure within the city.

For the time being, we'll have to play the waiting game.

All images in this article belong to Glancy Nicholls Architects

To keep up with the latest news in and around Birmingham, follow Greater Birmingham Developments on Twitter and on Instagram.

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30 passion points
Construction & regeneration
03 Oct 2019 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of 103 Colmore Row - October 2019

Some early morning shots as the sun came up in this construction photo update, the second crane has been installed this week.

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The Construction of 103 Colmore Row - October 2019





Some early morning shots as the sun came up in this construction photo update, the second crane has been installed this week.


Photos by Daniel Sturley

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60 passion points
Art, culture & creativity
03 Oct 2019 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Barry Flanagan bronze sculptures at the IKON Gallery

There is a free exhibition at the IKON Gallery in Oozells Square (housed in the former Oozells Street Boarding School) by the late sculptor Barry Flanagan. Mostly of bronze hares. They are in the galleries on Level 1 and 2. One is also outside in Oozells Square.

https://www.ikon-gallery.org/event/barry-flanagan/

Related

Barry Flanagan bronze sculptures at the IKON Gallery





There is a free exhibition at the IKON Gallery in Oozells Square (housed in the former Oozells Street Boarding School) by the late sculptor Barry Flanagan. Mostly of bronze hares. They are in the galleries on Level 1 and 2. One is also outside in Oozells Square.

https://www.ikon-gallery.org/event/barry-flanagan/


This free exhibition is on at the IKON Gallery from the 18th September to 24th November 2019. A collection of the sculpted works of the late Barry Flanagan (1941-2009). The gallery is open Tuesday's to Sundays from 11am to 5pm.

Link to his estates official website: Estate of Barry Flanagan.

Thinker on a Rock by Barry Flanagan. A hare with a violin in Oozells Square, Brindleyplace. View towards Piccolino.

View towards Cielo Italian.

Bronze Hare sculptures by Barry Flanagan on Level 1 of the IKON Gallery.

More on Level 2. More bronze hares sculptures by Barry Flanagan.

I'm sure these pieces have titles, although I'm not sure what they are called. Didn't see any signs with them.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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