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Green open spaces
01 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Sunday evening walk around Shirley Park on the 7th June 2020

On the evening of Sunday 7th June 2020 we went to Shirley in Solihull for a walk around Shirley Park and some of the surrounding roads such as Haslucks Green Road and Hurdis Road. Heading back into the park, found a field that led to a secret wooded walk. Also in the former putting green was daisies and carnations. Due to the pandemic the playground and dog agility area were both closed.

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Sunday evening walk around Shirley Park on the 7th June 2020





On the evening of Sunday 7th June 2020 we went to Shirley in Solihull for a walk around Shirley Park and some of the surrounding roads such as Haslucks Green Road and Hurdis Road. Heading back into the park, found a field that led to a secret wooded walk. Also in the former putting green was daisies and carnations. Due to the pandemic the playground and dog agility area were both closed.


Most days of lockdown, not been going out that much. And some weekends at home all day. We went in the car down to Shirley, parking on the Stratford Road (before the lay-bys were closed off), and had another walk around Shirley Park after 7pm in the evening. This was on the evening of Sunday 7th June 2020 (3 weeks ago at the time of writing this).

My previous Shirley Park post is here: Shirley Park over the years off the Stratford Road in Shirley.

 

Entering the main entrance on the Stratford Road in Shirley saw this War Memorial bench. It was part of the Fields in Trust commemorative war memorial benches, that have been placed all over the country marking the Centenary of the First World War (The Great War 1914-18). (during 2014-18).

Not far from Shirley Parkgate was another War Memorial bench. This one commemorating those lost during the Second World War (1939-45). There is also a war memorial here.

Looking to the Shirley Park Play Area / playground. Closed during lockdown / the pandemic. But saw a pair sitting on the swings.

Near a bench heading to the Haslucks Green Road exit / entrance was this hopscotch board on the path. Probably drawn in chalk.

Walked down Haslucks Green Road and re-entered the park from the Hurdis Road entrance / exit.

Cyclists going past the Welcome to Shirley Park noticeboard.

Turned right into this former football field. There was markings on the grass that showed that something used to be here. Also the edges of the field were raised up for some reason or other.

This view was after briefly going down the secret wooded path. The main footpath in the park can be seen near that line of trees.

The former football field had paths going into the wood, so we checked it out. Never been round this part before.

It is part of a Wetland Walk. Trees cover the walk, while the path seemed to be covered in leaves and wood chippings.

The path wasn't very long. Normally my Shirley Park walks would take me back into the park via Grenville Road.

Near the end of the wooded walk, there is a barrier up ahead.

Looking back into the former football field where the exit to the secret path was.

A close up look at the Dog Agility Area while it is closed during the lockdown. Dogs can go up the ramp and jump through the hoop.

Dog owners could sit on a bench. But instead with it closed, dog owners have to walk their dog around the park. It seems like they keep taking them off the leash a lot. Plus they bark a lot if another dog goes past (or a human they are not familiar with). I prefer cats.

Final section through the former putting green. Now a wildflower meadow. Saw this Common Starling on the grass.

The Wildflower Meadow had a lot of daisies and carnations. Which looked nice.

Close up look at some daisies.

Close up look at the carnations.

On the way out near ALDI, saw this bin with the message: "If the bin is full, take your litter home. Think First!".

Love Solihull and the Friends of Shirley Park.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Construction & regeneration
30 Jun 2020 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of 103 Colmore Row - Late June 2020

103 Colmore Row claims to be 'Above all else', well it pretty much is now as it's on the top of the ridge above the Rea Valley where the city centre drops down towards Digbeth and Southside. The building is very close to structural top out and the cladding is being glimpsed from much further away now. Loads of photos in this post from our regular contributors...

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The Construction of 103 Colmore Row - Late June 2020





103 Colmore Row claims to be 'Above all else', well it pretty much is now as it's on the top of the ridge above the Rea Valley where the city centre drops down towards Digbeth and Southside. The building is very close to structural top out and the cladding is being glimpsed from much further away now. Loads of photos in this post from our regular contributors...


LATEST PICTURES FROM THE CITY CENTRE

30th June:

28th June:

27th June:

26th June:

24th June:

22nd June:

Photos by Daniel Sturley

26th June:

Photos by Stephen Giles

But of course, you don't need to visit Birmingham City Centre to be able to capture a glimpse of the building. It's awe-inspiringly visible from the suburbs too as these pictures from Elliott Brown show.

Waseley Hills Country Park: 29th June.

TYSELEY: 21st June.

TYSELEY: Mayfield Road (above) and Tyseley Station (below).

EDGBASTON RESERVOIR: 15th June

Photos by Elliott Brown

& BACK INTO THE CITY CENTRE

12th-19th June:

Photos by Daniel Sturley

Don't forget to check the regularly updated Full Gallery

 
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30 passion points
Classic Architecture
30 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

History of The Grand Hotel, Birmingham

The Grand Hotel, Birmingham was established in 1879 on a site on Colmore Row on land owned by Isaac Horton and the architect was Thomson Plevins. The Victorian hotel was near the original Victorian Snow Hill Station. Derelict for many years. Most of the 2010s was spent restoring the hotel. Also down Church Street.

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History of The Grand Hotel, Birmingham





The Grand Hotel, Birmingham was established in 1879 on a site on Colmore Row on land owned by Isaac Horton and the architect was Thomson Plevins. The Victorian hotel was near the original Victorian Snow Hill Station. Derelict for many years. Most of the 2010s was spent restoring the hotel. Also down Church Street.


The Grand Hotel, Birmingham

Built between 1875 and 1879 The Grand Hotel was opened on the 1st February 1879. It was build on land opposite St Philip's Church (not a Cathedral at this time) on Colmore Row. Also down Church Street with the back end on Barwick Street. Until the 1870s there was Georgian terraces surrounding St Philip's Churchyard. The leases on these began to end in the 1860s and they were demolished. The site was acquired by Isaac Horton, a major Birmingham landowner. His architect was Thomson Plevins. The hotel opened at the time with 100 rooms. There was also a restaurant and two coffee rooms. The hotel was let to Arthur Field, a hotel operator from Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

The hotel was extended in 1880 when the corner on Church Street and Barwick Street was built. By 1890 the hotel operator was running into financial problems and it was handed back to Horton Estates Ltd. In the 1890s the architects Martin and Chamberlain was hired to reconstruct and redecorate the hotel. The hotel was built in the French Renaissance style, so it wouldn't look out of place in Paris. Was even a room in Louis XIV style decoration.

In the 20th century, the hotel was host to royalty, celebrities, politicians of the day, who would wine and dine in the Grosvenor Suites. The likes of King George VI, Neville Chamberlain, Winston Churchill, Charlie Chaplin, Malcolm X etc attended functions or stayed in the hotel at the time. The hotel ran into problems and closed in 1969. Hickmet Hotels took over the lease of the hotel from 1972 until 1976. In 1977 Grand Metropolitan Hotels took it over. The architect Harper Sperring did some modernisation works in 1978. The lease passed to Queens' Moat Hotels in the 1980s and 1990s, but little was done to the hotel at that time.

The hotel closed down again in 2002. The owner wanted to knock it down in 2003, but The Victorian Society stepped into save it. In 2004 the hotel was given a Grade II* listing protecting it from demolition. Restoration works of the hotel began in 2012, with the hope that it would reopen sometime in 2020.

 

One of my earlist photos of the Grand Hotel taken in February 2010 from Cathedral Square (St Philip's Cathedral grounds). Under scaffolding, it wasn't clear what was going to happen to it at this point.

In October 2010, a look past Bagel Nation and some of the other shops that used to be down here.You can see columns with Corinthian capitals at what was the main entrance to the hotel. There used to be a Starbucks down here and Snappy Snaps.

Another look during December 2010 from Colmore Row. The scaffolding covered the top half of the hotel.

By February 2013 restoration work had began on the Grand Hotel. And from Colmore Row you could see even more scaffolding and hoardings at ground level. As well as down Church Street.

Now down on Church Street, with a look down Barwick Street. The architecture style changed here as this was the 1880 extension. The 1890s additions were by Martin & Chamberlain.

The buildings down on Barwick Street were built of red brick. The hotel ends where Barclays Bank is today.

This view was taken during March 2014 from Cathedral Square. There was still scaffolding wrapped all around the building at this time.

In April 2015 they were rebuilding the roof and installing steel girders underneath.

Many of the previous shops had to move out of the Grand Hotel, but the signs remained. In October 2015 there was banners on Colmore Row for the Rugley World Cup 2015 which was being held in England. The view from the 141 bus.

By December 2015 the scaffolding had come down and you could see the restored stonework on the hotel. Still a crane on site at the time, but the roof looked finished. Still hoardings on the ground floor. Cathedral Square view in the rain.

Ground floor hoardings were coming down by February 2016. And new shops, cafes and restaurants were ready to be fitted here.

By October 2016 many of the new shops, cafes and restaurants were open. Including 200 Degrees Coffee, Cycle Republic and The Alchemist.

An autumnal look during November 2016 from Cathedral Square. With buses on Colmore Row in front of the Grand Hotel. Leaves on the lawn around the St Philip's Cathedral chuchyard.

A nightshot taken during February 2017, near the corner of Church Street and Colmore Row. All the scaffolding had gone. All of the new venues on Colmore Row were open. The Alchemist is on the corner.

Onto April 2017 from Cathedral Square, where you can see Cycle Republic, Up & Running, Liquor Store, Crockett & Jones and 200 Degrees Coffee.

More of the same from September 2017. Some of the shops had blinds open. It really does feel like you are in Paris, or maybe even Birmingham's French Twin City of Lyon? What do you think?

In December 2017 a walk down Barwick Street. A new venue had opened called Primitivo, which was a Bar & Eatery.

I last went down Barwick Street at the back of the Grand Hotel during October 2019. The new venue here is called Tattu.

Plus a second look at Primitivo.

Hopefully the hotel will open soon. Was supposed to be in Summer 2020. But due to the pandemic / lockdown, will it be delayed even further?

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Construction & regeneration
30 Jun 2020 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

The Construction of The Mercian - June 2020

The core has jumped up to level 23, signalling a landmark milestone as the building goes past the halfway stage. The floors aren't far behind on level 19!

Elsewhere, the cladding has now reached floor 5, as it continues wrapping around the building. Click the post for a superb round of pictures from Daniel, Reiss, Elliott and Stephen.

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The Construction of The Mercian - June 2020





The core has jumped up to level 23, signalling a landmark milestone as the building goes past the halfway stage. The floors aren't far behind on level 19!

Elsewhere, the cladding has now reached floor 5, as it continues wrapping around the building. Click the post for a superb round of pictures from Daniel, Reiss, Elliott and Stephen.


LATEST PICTURES FROM THE CITY CENTRE

30th June:

28th June:

Photos by Daniel Sturley

26th June:

Photo by GregglesUK

Photos by Stephen Giles

Meanwhile, the core is only halfway up but it is already rapidly creeping up on its neighbours, as viewed here from Bank Tower II:

Photos from BrumBrumBrum

17th June:

Photos by Reiss Gordon-Henry

Outside of the city centre, Elliott has taken a number of fabulous images showcasing the prominence The Mercian is already having on the skyline - with numerous shots from the 15th-29th taken from different vantage points around the region, including: Edgbaston Reservoir, Tyseley Station, and the Waseley Hills Country Park over in Worcestershire.

Edgbaston Reservoir: 15th June.

Tyseley Station: 21st June.

Waseley Hills Country Park: 29th June.

Photos by Elliott Brown

Daniel also took a trip to his favorite spot for the city skyline at Egg Hill near Frankley about 7 miles south-west of the city to grab a few latest shots:

13th June:

 
Words by: Stephen Giles

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30 passion points
Art, culture & creativity
30 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Whatever happened to Antony Gormley's Iron:Man in Victoria Square?

Iron:Man by Anthony Gormley was originally located in Victoria Square from 1993 until it was moved to storage in 2017. Originally named Untitled but nicknamed as Iron:Man. The TSB used to be in Victoria Square House and it was their gift to the City (until their HQ moved to Bristol). When will it return and where will it go?

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Whatever happened to Antony Gormley's Iron:Man in Victoria Square?





Iron:Man by Anthony Gormley was originally located in Victoria Square from 1993 until it was moved to storage in 2017. Originally named Untitled but nicknamed as Iron:Man. The TSB used to be in Victoria Square House and it was their gift to the City (until their HQ moved to Bristol). When will it return and where will it go?


Iron:Man by Antony Gormley

The statue of the Iron:Man used to be located in Victoria Square from March 1993 until it was removed to storage in September 2017, to make way for the Westside Metro extension to Centenary Square. While this extension opened in December 2019, Antony Gormley's Iron:Man has yet to return. As new paving was being laid in Victoria Square. And as far as I am aware, it is not yet finished (I've not been back to the City Centre in 3 months of lockdown, but have seen other peoples recent photos of the square).

It was originally a gift to the city from the TSB whose headquarters used to be in Victoria Square House. Unveiled in 1993. It was originally named Untitled but gained the nickname Iron:Man from locals. It is made of iron. The TSB moved out of Victoria Square House when they merged with Lloyds Bank in 1995.

The statue was cast at the Firth Rixon Castings in Willenhall. It represented the traditional skills of Birmingham and the Black Country.

The statue remained in place for many years, it was suggested that it be relocate to Bristol which was the new headquarters location of Lloyds TSB. But as it was a gift to the City of Birmingham it remained here. But it was removed to storage in September 2017 ahead of the building of the Westside Metro extension to Centenary Square (Grand Central Tram Stop to Library Tram Stop).

I would assume that it could return to Victoria Square later in 2020 if the paving is finished.

 

Iron:Man maquette at the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre

During my September 2018 visit to the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre, while I did not find the full sized Iron:Man, I did find this maquette.

This was Antony Gormley's preliminary model made out of painted plaster.

It apparently used to be located at the the Public Art Commissions Agency in the Jewellery Quarter, but for whatever reason, it ended up in storage here in the warehouse.

Iron:Man in Victoria Square until 2017

My first photo of the Iron:Man was taken during April 2009, when I started going around Birmingham with my camera. Here backed with the Town Hall.

The next view of the Iron:Man was taken during May 2009 facing Victoria Square House.

The Birmingham Frankfurt Christmas Market was on during November 2009, with this Iron:Man view. You can also see the old 103 Colmore Row AKA National Westminster House by the late John Madin.

The Iron:Man seen during May 2011. Union Jack bunting was up around Victoria Square near the Town Hall during the early May Bank Holiday weekend that followed the wedding of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (Aston Villa fan Prince William and Catherine Middleton).

It was Armed Forces Day in Victoria Square during June 2011. There was members of the British Armed Forces in uniform near the Iron:Man.

Including members of the Royal Air Force, Royal Navy and British Army. The Iron:Man had been in this slanted position since being installed back in 1993.

The snow of January 2013 as I headed past the Iron:Man towards Broad Street. Probably the only timed I've caught the Iron:Man covered in snow!

Back to Spring like weather in April 2013. And the Iron:Man was witness to the English Market at the St George's Day Celebrations that year.

The Iron:Man in September 2013 with a British Red Cross tent during the 4 Squares Weekender.

Caught a glimpse of the Iron:Man in Victoria Square during June 2014 when the Lord Mayors Show 2014 was being held. At the time there was some men doing bike tricks near the Council litter pickers!

Some of my last views of the Iron:Man. The view below taken in August 2017. A month before being removed to storage.

Last views in September 2017. A seagull was standing on Iron:Man's head. And left bird mess on top of it.

Pink Midland Metro Alliance barriers and fences had gone around the statue, as workmen were preparing to remove the statue and take it to storage. About a week after this it was gone.

Iron:Man had been in storage now for almost 3 years. When will he return? Where exactly in Victoria Square will he be placed? Perhaps in front of the Town Hall? Could he come back near the end of 2020?

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points

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