Popular
Posts
1312
Points
55K
BirminghamWeAre

A City for All

BirminghamWeAre is a community devoted to social value, providing a shared space for people who make a difference and together have a positive social impact across the City.

Launch date: August 2018
Combined FreeTimePays following: 101K


Community sponsors:

Modern Architecture
15 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Library of Birmingham and Baskerville House from 2010 to 2019

The view of the construction of the Library of Birmingham next to Baskerville House from 2010 to 2013. Then some other views in the years until 2019. Watch the cores of the Library rise, then the golden cladding then all the circles. Was even a view from where the Edward VII statue was installed.

Related View community

The Library of Birmingham and Baskerville House from 2010 to 2019





The view of the construction of the Library of Birmingham next to Baskerville House from 2010 to 2013. Then some other views in the years until 2019. Watch the cores of the Library rise, then the golden cladding then all the circles. Was even a view from where the Edward VII statue was installed.


Previous Library of Birmingham posts here:

Views of the Library of Birmingham next to Baskerville House. Construction from 2010 to 2013. Opened from September 2013. Views until the end of 2019.

2010

November 2010: views from the bridge on Centenary Way. The restored King Edward VII statue had just been installed in Centenary Square.

December 2010: slighty hazzy conditions at the end of the year.

2011

March 2011: A few more floors had gone up on the Library, up to about Level 3 or 4.

October 2011: The main body of the Library had reached the future home of the Shakespeare Memorial Room, while cladding had gone up to Level 3 or 4.

A perspective of the Library construction with Baskerville House from behind the statue of King Edward VII. Which had been in this spot for almost a year at this point.

December 2011: The rest of the golden cladding and windows goes up to Level 8. And the structure forms around the cylinder at the top where the Shakespeare Memorial Room and Skyline Viewpoint would be on Level 9. Cladding from Level 2 down to the ground floor was complete.

2012

November 2012: Only got a view from near the Alpha Tower towards the Library of Birmingham, Baskerville House and the Hall of Memory. From where I was would one day be part of the Arena Central development site.

2013

January 2013: A few days into the New Year and was these hoardings in front of Baskerville House. Cladding on the Library was complete.

The snow fall from the middle of January 2013. Can hardly see the Hyatt, while snow surrounds the Hall of Memory.

The snow was falling as I went past Baskerville House.

April 2013: From the bridge on Centenary Way. Compare to my earlier views from 2010 and 2011. From here the Library looked complete but wouldn't open for another 5 months. Flower beds were on the bridge over Paradise Circus Queensway.

August 2013: Near the end of the month, the hoards had gone, and the gardens opened up.

This landscaping would only last until about 2017 before Centenary Square was redeveloped again.

Broad Street panoramic including the Library of Birmingham, Baskerville House and Hall of Memory. Hanging flower pots in the middle. This is all now gone for Library Tram Stop.

September 2013: A few days after the Library had opened to the public for the first time, there was long queues as far as Baskerville House. I waited a couple of weeks more before going in for the first time.

I went into the Library of Birmingham for the first couple of times near the end of September 2013. Was still a lot of people around, but the queues were as long as when it first opened.

2014

November 2014: The Library of Birmingham had been open for 14 months and there was some scaffolding up on Baskerville House for some restoration work on the stonework. Poppies up for the annual remembrance commemorations.

2015

May 2015: A long queue on a Saturday morning at 11am to get into of the Library of Birmingham. Just two more years for this paving and the grass before Centenary Square was redeveloped again. Baskerville House shining brightly in the sunshine.

2017

December 2017: Nightshots for when the Library of Birmingham was lit up in all the colours of the rainbow when Birmingham was officially announced as the Host City of the Commonwealth Games 2022. Baskerville House lit up in bright white light. As was the Hall of Memory. Redevelopment of Centenary Square had started by this point.

2018

December 2018: Views of the Library of Birmingham from Bridge Street near the site of 5 Centenary Square at Arena Central (to date it hasn't been built). Formerly called 1 Arena Central. From here you could also see the BT Tower.

2019

December 2019: My last photos of the Library of Birmingham with Baskerville House were taken from Paradise Street, just beyond Town Hall Tram Stop. At the time Ice Skate Birmingham was in Centenary Square. Arena Central with the Alpha Tower and HSBC UK at 1 Centenary Square to the left.

West Midlands Metro trams can now go past the Library of Birmingham. The extension to Centenary Square opened in December 2019.

For more tram photos in December 2019 at Town Hall Tram Stop see this post: West Midlands Metro tram in and out of Town Hall Tram Stop on the last weekend of the Birmingham FCM (December 2019).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

Share  Connect with us
60 passion points
Transport
14 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

RAF A400M and C17 flights over the skies of Birmingham in May 2020

There has been several test flights by the RAF A400M and C17 over the skies of Birmingham, and the rest of the country since British Airspace went quite since lockdown came into force. So the RAF have been having test flights. During April 2020 I kept missing seeing the planes, although saw it once but not camera ready. 7th May for A400M and 11th May for the C17.

Related View community

RAF A400M and C17 flights over the skies of Birmingham in May 2020





There has been several test flights by the RAF A400M and C17 over the skies of Birmingham, and the rest of the country since British Airspace went quite since lockdown came into force. So the RAF have been having test flights. During April 2020 I kept missing seeing the planes, although saw it once but not camera ready. 7th May for A400M and 11th May for the C17.


On Thursday 7th May 2020, I was made aware that the RAF A400M was scheduled to fly over the skies of Birmingham, just didn't know when. Sometime after 7pm that evening, I could here it coming, so rushed up to get my camera and take some zoom ins as it circled over Birmingham. I've got Super Zoom, but it was going beyond optical zoom on my bridge camera to digital zoom. And was a bit hard to lock onto the plane as it flew around, but tried my best. Gallery below of the nine photos I got.

 

Monday 11th May 2020 update: saw it again, accept it was an RAF C17. See the photos further down the post. Actually rushed up the stairs twice to get my camera, the C17 went around about twice.

 

The Airbus A400M is a four engine turboprop military transport aircraft. In the UK, it has been in service with the Royal Air Force since 2014. They had an order of 25, but that was reduced to 22.

 

With a clear blue sky that evening, also caught some shadows on the military plane as it flew overhead. This after 7pm in the evening.

The A400M has four sets of propellers.

 

Before that, the only none commercial plane I've seen while on a daily walk on lockdown was this Embraer Phenom 300 - G-CKAZ. On Friday 24th April 2020. It was going on a round trip from Birmingham Airport and back. Then it went up again and back to BHX.

 

Update on the 11th May 2020. Saw another military plane flying over the skies of Birmingham, thought it was the A400M, but no, it was the C17 Globemaster.

It was originally developed for the United States Air Force in the 1980s to the early 1990s. Also known as: McDonnell Douglas/Boeing C-17 Globemaster III. The Royal Air Force started receiving them in the late 1990s. They received several of them in the 2000s and 2010s.

 

Saw it twice around 1pm at lunchtime. The C17 has four sets of jets.

The second return so I up I went to get some more photo zoom ins.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks to all my followers.

Share  Connect with us
50 passion points
Classic Architecture
14 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Before the Library of Birmingham there was Baskerville Basin

Before construction of the Library of Birmingham was begun by Carillion in 2010, archaeologists were on site in the summer of 2009 digging up the former car park, revealing the former Baskerville Basin. Part of the canal network used to stretch into what is now Centenary Square, but was filled in during the 1930s to make way for a proposed Civic Centre. I saw the remains in August 2009.

Related View community

Before the Library of Birmingham there was Baskerville Basin





Before construction of the Library of Birmingham was begun by Carillion in 2010, archaeologists were on site in the summer of 2009 digging up the former car park, revealing the former Baskerville Basin. Part of the canal network used to stretch into what is now Centenary Square, but was filled in during the 1930s to make way for a proposed Civic Centre. I saw the remains in August 2009.


For more on John Baskerville check out my post here: John Baskerville: creator of his own typeface.

 

Before Carillion could start building the Library of Birmingham in January 2010, archaeologists had to go on the site in the summer of 2009. For many years the land between Baskerville House and The REP had been used as a car park for the Council. Once the upper layers were dug up, they could start digging up the remains and see what was left below. Intact brick walls of Baskerville Basin were found on the site and many remains and finds. Towards the site of what is now Centenary Square used to be Gibson's Arm which was a private canal built during the 1810s. Baskerville Basin was filled in during 1938 before the proposed Civic Centre was to be built. While Baskerville House and the Hall of Memory were built, the rest of the proposals weren't indirectly due to the outbreak of World War Two.

 

A map printed in 1880, this section showing Baskerville Wharf between Cambridge Street and Broad Street. Old Wharf is below (that was later filled in as well).

I would assume that the original scanner took it from the Library of Birmingham's maps area.

Map below in the Birmingham History Galleries, BM & AG, of the location of Old Wharf. In the 18th Century where John Baskerville's house on what was Easy Row. Baskerville Wharf was located a little further to the north west of here.

Also see my post on the model of the proposed square we never got: The Centenary Square we never got in the 1940s. Had the plans gone ahead there could have been formal gardens on this site.

This model (seen below) is at the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre.

 

The following 8 photos were taken down the service road between Baskerville House and the site of the Library of Birmingham during August 2009. View towards the Hyatt Hotel and The REP.

View towards The REP.

Brick walls were sticking out of the ground. I wonder if they had to dig them up, so there would be room for the basement levels of the Library?

That side of The REP would get demolished during the construction of the Library.

At this point the only hoardings were in Centenary Square.

This would be the only time that I saw the remains of the brick walls in the ground.

This canal basin / arm used to link up to the Birmingham & Fazeley Canal. But now City Centre Gardens and the Civic Centre Towers are built over that end beyond Cambridge Street.

One more view including the Hyatt Hotel and Symphony Hall.

I've got hundreds to thousands of photos of the Library of Birmingham, so any future post will have to be a small highlight of them. Such as during the construction or when it was first opened in 2013.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

Share  Connect with us
50 passion points
Green open spaces
13 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

From Barnt Green to the Lickey Hills Country Park Visitor Centre and back

In April 2017, I got the train to Barnt Green Station in Barnt Green, Worcestershire, and went into the Lickey Hills Country Park on the walk up the hill to the Visitor Centre. I was aware of the entrance near the station on a previous visit to Barnt Green during April 2015 (2 years earlier). And the other side from Rose Hill and Barnt Green Road in April 2013.

Related View community

From Barnt Green to the Lickey Hills Country Park Visitor Centre and back





In April 2017, I got the train to Barnt Green Station in Barnt Green, Worcestershire, and went into the Lickey Hills Country Park on the walk up the hill to the Visitor Centre. I was aware of the entrance near the station on a previous visit to Barnt Green during April 2015 (2 years earlier). And the other side from Rose Hill and Barnt Green Road in April 2013.


For my first Lickey Hills post click this link: Beacon Hill at the Lickey Hills Country Park.

In April 2017, I caught a Class 323 train on the Cross City Line to Barnt Green Station, for the walk up the Lickey Hills Country Park towards the Visitor Centre. After popping into the Visitor Centre, I passed an Orchard on the way to Rose Hill. The walk was so long and steep, I felt it was easier to return to the station by walking along Barnt Green Station. Back in April 2013 when I first want to go to Beacon Hill, I was close to the area, but ended up going to Cofton Park instead. On my first train trip to Barnt Green I found the entrance to the Country Park there in April 2015, and made a mental note to return one day. Took me two years before I came back.

2013

In April 2013, I made my first attempt to get to the Lickey Hills Country Park. With the desire to go to Beacon Hill, at the time I did not know how to get there. I walked along Rose Hill near Cofton Hackett, but the paths up to the Visitor Centre side were closed at the time.

Footbridge over a stream, you can get to the Lickey Hills Visitor Centre by heading up the path to the left.

The paths goes steep up the hill. But some were closed due to the diseased trees.

So at the time, this was as close as I would get to the Visitor Centre. There was a pedestrian diversion in place at the time. I only wanted to go to Beacon Hill at first (which I did a few weeks later).

I also headed down Barnt Green Road, so many trees down here, but at the time didn't walk all the way down. So wasn't until 4 years later that I spotted paths into the country park. On this side is Bilberry Hill.

So instead I went into Cofton Park, which is south of Longbridge (post coming soon once the project is set up).

2015

I first got a train to Barnt Green in April 2015, mainly for a look around the Barnt Green area (and not to go into the Lickey Hills Country Park). But I did see the entrance to the park from Fiery Hill Road. Cherry Hill Drive is to the right.

According to the Welcome sign, the Lickey Hills Country Park Visitor Centre was 1.25 miles away from here.

The dirt path from Barnt Green goes up the hill.

Horses and bicycles are now allowed up this section.

There was also this wooden shelter with maps of the park on both sides. At this end it is called the Pinfields Wood. It would be two years before I got the train back to Barnt Green.

2017

I next got a train to Barnt Green Station during April 2017, this time for the walk towards the Lickey Hills Country Park Visitor Centre. From the gate, view of the station near Fiery Hill Road.

Similar view to 2 years earlier near Cherry Hill Drive, except this time I would walk up the hill. It leads to Cherry Hill Road. This is the Pinfields Wood.

Approaching the end of the first section at Cherry Hill Road. Had to cross over the road and continue into the section known as Lickey Warren.

Heading into the Lickey Warren part of the Lickey Hills Country Park on the long walk to the visitor centre.

On the Bluebell Trail, a field of bluebells.

The path continues amongst the trees with the bluebells on both sides.

The Hope Hut with picnic benches underneath.

Still heading up as some kids have fun running about. Trees are quite tall here.

Approaching the Lickey Hills Country Park Visitor Centre for a drink and a sit down.

The car park on the other side of the Visitor Centre. After my break, I next walked down towards Rose Hill.

Now on Warren Lane, this brick building is the School Room. Would assume that this is the classroom used by visiting schools that come to the Country Park, before they go out and explore it for educational purposes.

Heading down Drovers Way, then a brief stop on the left at the Orchard.

It's the Lickey Hills Community Orchard. The trees were planted between 2012 and 2014 by the Lickey Hills Society and the Ranger Team.

A close up look at the new trees in the orchard. At this point, they had only been there for 3 to 5 years.

Back onto Drovers Way on the path down to Rose Hill. Some fallen trees in the wood.

Some small wooden bollards on the path. Not too far down to Rose Hill. A bit further on the path would get a bit muddy.

A while later on the walk back to Barnt Green Station, I was now on Barnt Green Road. At Kendal End was this wooden gate. A bit muddy here. Was near a quarry. All part of Bilberry Hill going this way.

At least two gates to the quarry at Kendal End. Some of the plants around here were still diseased so you had to stick to the footpaths and have clean footwear. Also don't remove plant material from the site.

Fingerposts to Barn Green Road Quarry and the other to the Visitor Centre.

I only briefly checked out this entrance before going back onto Barnt Green Road.

There was another path and gate to Kendal End a bit further down. Even from here was signs warning you about the diseased plants.

I will next for this area have to do a Cofton Park post. So watch this space. Coming soon.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

Share  Connect with us
60 passion points
Transport
13 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Airlines gone but not forgotten at Birmingham Airport: BMI Baby

In Part 2 of our look at airlines sadly gone from Birmingham Airport, we look at BMI Baby. This low cost airline operated from 2002 until 2012. Trading as Bmibaby Limited (styled as bmibaby.com). They had bases at Birmingham Airport and East Midlands Airport. I only got to fly with them in May 2011 to Nice and back. Sadly they went out of business in 2012.

Related View community

Airlines gone but not forgotten at Birmingham Airport: BMI Baby





In Part 2 of our look at airlines sadly gone from Birmingham Airport, we look at BMI Baby. This low cost airline operated from 2002 until 2012. Trading as Bmibaby Limited (styled as bmibaby.com). They had bases at Birmingham Airport and East Midlands Airport. I only got to fly with them in May 2011 to Nice and back. Sadly they went out of business in 2012.


Bmibaby

Bmibaby operated from 2002 until 2012 and was a low cost British airline, with bases at Birmingham Airport and East Midlands Airport. At the time that they went out of business, they were using Boeing 737-300 and Boeing 737-500 planes. They were quite small.

Only once went on holiday with them, heading to Nice Airport (for the Provence holiday in the South of France during May 2011). I did see them once more at Birmingham Airport in June 2012.

 

Billboard seen near Olton Station in June 2010 for bmibaby.com. It was near bridge no 208 on Ulverley Green Road in Olton, Solihull.

Scorchio, baby!

They had (at the time) loads of great summer flights from only £24.99. To places such as Faro, Nice or Alicante.

Another billboard, this one was seen on the Coventry Road in Sheldon (not far from the Sheldon Country Park). During January 2012.

BRIGHTEN UP YOUR JANUARY BABY!

At the time they were having a massive January Sale on flights & holidays. But they announced in May 2012 that they would be shutting down by September 2012. So it was a bit too late. (Hopefully Summer 2012 wasn't too badly affected by the eventual shut-down).

 

While at Birmingham Airport in June 2012 (before catching our Thomson Airways flight to Naples in Italy) saw these bmibaby.com planes. Boeing 737-300.

They had different images of babies on the tail fin at the back. This was a year after we flew with them to Nice in the South of France.

 

Some views from the May 2011 flight with bmibaby from Birmingham to Nice.

 

Some views of the plane wing on the flight back from Nice to Birmingham, May 2011. Was sitting near the window closest to the wing on the right.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

Share  Connect with us
40 passion points

Top Contributors

Daniel Sturley
BirminghamWeAre points: 20K
Combined FreeTimePays points: 48K
Elliott Brown
BirminghamWeAre points: 16K
Combined FreeTimePays points: 54K
FreeTimePays
BirminghamWeAre points: 9551
Combined FreeTimePays points: 21K
Stephen Giles
BirminghamWeAre points: 2400
Combined FreeTimePays points: 12K
Karl Newton
BirminghamWeAre points: 1470
Combined FreeTimePays points: 2910

Show more