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Classic Architecture
07 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

A look around Aston Hall during the Heritage Open Day in September 2017

During the September 2017 Birmingham Heritage Week event the Civil War Siege 1643, I had a chance to have a look around all the rooms at Aston Hall, while it was not too busy. Come with me as we look around these rooms dating back to the 17th century while we are in self isolation. Some interiors may date the 18th century. From Sir Thomas Holte to James Watt Jr.

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A look around Aston Hall during the Heritage Open Day in September 2017





During the September 2017 Birmingham Heritage Week event the Civil War Siege 1643, I had a chance to have a look around all the rooms at Aston Hall, while it was not too busy. Come with me as we look around these rooms dating back to the 17th century while we are in self isolation. Some interiors may date the 18th century. From Sir Thomas Holte to James Watt Jr.


My visit to Aston Hall was on the 16th September 2017.

For my previous Aston Hall or Aston Park posts check out my previous posts here:

Quick history recap: Aston Hall was built between 1618 and 1635 by John Thorpe for Sir Thomas Holte, who moved into the hall in 1631 (before it was complete). The house was damaged by Parliamentary troops during the Civil War in 1643 (it still has visible scars). The house was sold and leased to James Watt Jr. in 1817. It became a museum after 1858. The Birmingham Corporation bought the house in 1864. Now run by the Birmingham Museums Trust, who took over from Birmingham City Council in 2012.

Aston Hall The East Front painted in 1854 by John Joseph Hughes. Public Domain.

Isometric View of Aston Hall, painted in 1860 by Allen Edward Everitt. Public Domain.

Public Domain Dedication images above from the collection of the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery. Which are free to download from this link.

View below of Aston Hall in September 2017 before the Civil War Siege 1643 event began.

Rear view of Aston Hall from the back in Aston Park. Pan sculpture in the middle.

Now for a tour around Aston Hall.

The Great Hall

Seen during the Civil War Siege re-enactment. The actor on the left was playing Sir Thomas Holte. The portrait of the real Sir Thomas Holte was on the wall in the middle.

The portrait of Sir Thomas Holte in the Great Hall.

Great Drawing Room

Bit like a lounge with chairs around a fireplace, and somewhere to have tea. Furnished in the 18th century style for James Watt Jr.

The Green Library

A desk in the middle of the room with old books all around. Probably where James Watt Jr sat to work in the 19th century.

Small Dining Room

Furnished in the 18th century style. Called the Dining Parlour in 1771, this room remained a family breakfast and dining room until 1848. The 18th century fireplace was installed in 1960.

Portrait of James Watt (1736 - 1819) in the Small Dining Room. He was the famous father of James Watt Jr. 

The Johnson Room

In the 1760s this was a dressing room also used by Sir Lister Holte as an estate office. In 1817 it was known as the Little Blue Room and in James Watt's time it was the Study or Yellow Library.

In 1882 it was lined with panelling taken from a house in Old Square which belonged to Dr Hector, a friend of Samuel Johnson, hence it's modern name. It now contains displays on the Hall's history as a public museum.

There was a stuffed tiger in this room.

The Great Parlour

When Aston Hall was built this was the family's principal living room. Around 1700 it was converted into a chapel. The room's Jacobean panelling survives and it is furnished with oak furniture from the same period.

The Orange Chamber

Bedroom on the first floor. More in the 17th century style up here. These rooms were in the West Range.

King Charles Room

Known as the Best Lodging Chamber in 1654, this was one of the rooms used by King Charles I when he spent the night of the 18th October 1642 at Aston, shortly before the Battle of Edgehill.

Featuring artefacts from the English Civil War period. Civil War armour and an open cabinet.

Great Dining Room

In this room King Charles I dined here in 1642, on his way to Kenilworth during the English Civil War. (you can see the table from both sides).

Withdrawing Room

A small room with a table and chairs, with an old tapestry to the back of the room.

Long Gallery

The most impressive room at Aston Hall! I was lucky enough to get the whole room to myself at one point. Amazing that this has survived the centuries.

The World Room

An exhibition gallery of small objects in this room. In the 1650s this room was the Chamber over the Scullery, the anteroom to Sir Thomas Holte's bedchamber. After 1700 it became Sir Lister Holte's library. Heneage Legge  (who came to live at Aston Hall in 1794) turned it into his new bedroom and inserted large sash windows. The room now contains displays which explore the global influences on fashionable living and the design and decoration of furniture and furnishings during the 17th and 18th centuries.

The Passage Room

This is the corridor between the rooms on the first floor.

Dressing Room

This was originally part of Sir Thomas Holte's bedchamber, this room was formed in about 1700. It was transformed by Sir Lister Holte in the 1750s who installed the fine fireplace. By 1771 it had become the Dressing Room to the Best Chamber. After 1794 it became the Dressing Room to Heneage Legge's Blue Room next door. By 1819 it was known as the Chinese Room.

Best Bedchamber

This room is not mentioned in the 1654 inventories, but it may have been Lady Holte's chamber. Around 1700 it was panelled and extended to the north, creating a large recess for a bed. It replaced the Chamber over the Kitchen as the principal family bedroom and was occupied by Sir Lister Holte and later by his widow, Sarah Newton. It is now furnished with pieces that would have decorated the bedchamber of a wealthy Georgian lady such as Lady Holte.

Oak Staircase

Up to Dick's Garret or down to exit. You can head up to the attic where the servants lived.

Dick's Garret

Replica 17th century servant's bed. Up here was where the servant's of Aston Hall slept for the night. Probably as it was during the 18th century.

Servants Hall

Probably the kitchen where the servants prepared food for the Holte family. The following rooms are in the basement of Aston Hall.

The Pantry

This room was formed during the alterations to the kitchen around 1700. In 1771 it was the Butler's Room, where he kept the silver and his trays. After 1819 it was used by James Watt's footmen who cleaned the oil lamps here.

Kitchen

Servants seen preparing food in the kitchen during the Civil War Siege 1643 event (actors during the Birmingham Heritage Week re-enactment). It looks like there was breads and pastries on the tables. As well as butter and eggs. And a boars head!

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at more than 1,130 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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50 passion points
Construction & regeneration
07 May 2020 - Stephen Giles
News & Updates

PLANNING DECISIONS: 7th May 2020

Here's the lowdown on the BIG planning applications that were decided on this afternoon (May 7th), which included the rejuvenation of a Jewellery Quarter site, and a 178-bed student scheme.

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PLANNING DECISIONS: 7th May 2020





Here's the lowdown on the BIG planning applications that were decided on this afternoon (May 7th), which included the rejuvenation of a Jewellery Quarter site, and a 178-bed student scheme.


These are the main developments going to Planning Committee on May 7th 2020. 

(APPROVED) RESI: Heaton House Lofts, Camden Street, Jewellery Quarter.
(You can read more regarding Heaton House >here<
(APPROVED) STUDENT: 8 Selly Hill Road, Selly Oak.
(APPROVED) FAITH: Harborne - Manresa House, 10 Albert Road.
(APPROVED) LIDL Store, Hamstead, Former GKN Site Land at Old Walsall Road.
(APPROVED) MIXED-USE: Hockley - Community Vocational College.
(APPROVED) RESI: Minworth - Hansons Bridge Road.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DECISIONS:
 
STUDENT: 8 Selly Hill Road, Selly Oak
(Madison Construction LtdD5 Architects)
Application: 2019/09000/PA
Decision: Approved 8-4.
 
 

The site has today been approved (7/05/2020) and will now see demolition of the existing Selly Oak ex-servicemen's club, as well as 133 Dawlish Road, and the construction of a 178-bed student-led redevelopment.

The new build will vary from three-storeys to five, comprising of 6-10 bed clusters and studios, with shared lounges and kitchens.

A 3-storey frontage will take precedence on Selly Hill Road, however, due to the levels across the site, this will see two lower ground levels. The scheme will see two rear wings which will then drop down to 3 storeys in height at the rear.

To the rear, to go with the bin store & cycle storage, a landscaped communal amenity space is provided, as well as a communal lounge that will open out onto the amenity space. A cinema/games room and gym are also included in the scheme.

Artists Impressions from D5 Architects

FAITH: Harborne - Manresa House, 10 Albert Road

Application: 2020/00222/PA
Decision: Approved 10-0
 
 

Manresa House is a series of connected existing buildings set within large garden spaces to both front and rear. 

The building is owned by the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits) and functions as the provincial novitiate for the UK. A novitiate is where novices, or trainees, spend the first two years of their training period, where it can last over 10 years to become brothers or priests within the Society of Jesus. 



The redevelopment, now approved, aims to improve the functionality and accessibility of the site by way of demolition of modern extensions and the subsequent erection of two new 'wing' extensions to provide residential, religious and admin facilities.

A villa dating back to the 1840's will be retained and refurbished.

A total of 24 bedrooms (12 en-suite) will be provided, comprising of 18 bedrooms situated within the two-storey northern wing (12 novice bedrooms & 6 senior bedrooms, including one accessible), along with 7 bedrooms (6 guest beds and one accessible room) located in the southern wing.

Provided within these extensions include a new chapel, a new and improved library, support spaces, meeting rooms, kitchen, dining and laundry facilities. Buildings to be demolished include a 1980's Library building, plus residential wings

Parking provision on the site has not been altered and remains as is, however, it has been moved from the north end of the front garden to the south side.

Artists Impressions from OMI Architects

LIDL Store, Hamstead, Former GKN Site Land at Old Walsall Road

Application: 2019/08290/PA
Decision: Approved 11-0
 

Artists Impressions from Whittam Cox Architects

Construction of a single storey Lidl foodstore on a vacant area of land, sited to the eastern side of Old Walsall Road.

A total of 152 car parking spaces are included here, including 8 disabled bays and 9 parent and child spaces. A provisional 10 cycle storage racks are also provided.

MIXED-USE: Hockley - Community Vocational College, Former Muhammad Ali Centre

Decision: Approved 10-0
 
 

The site will now see demolition of an existing fire damaged building and the erection of a 300-space Community Vocational College for 14-25 year olds.

The development will focus on empowering local people with skills in the hospitality, health and social care and business sectors, providing employment placement opportunities by engaging them with local businesses.

Students between the ages of 14 to 29 will attend for both short and longer term courses, in some cases as part of apprenticeship arrangements with local businesses.

In close relation to the community vocational college an ‘enterprise employment hub’ (exhibition and meetings area) and 7 enterprise units will also be erected within the site and will be available on short-term leases.

On-site accommodation above the enterprise employment hub and units will provide 52 one and 11 two bedroom flats (63 bedrooms in total) targeted at older current students and graduates.

A central open square will act as a communal focus. 30 on-site car parking spaces will be provided when the site is not required for events.

The community sports building, the Muhammad Centre, is due for demolition. The building was the subject of a fire in 2002 and has remained derelict ever since.

Artists Impressions from Hodson Architects

RESI: Minworth - Hansons Bridge Road

Decision: Approved 10-0
 
 
Outline application with all matters reserved for the redevelopment of a brownfield land with the erection of 20 residential dwellings.

The site is set to deliver 8 one bedroom apartments; 6 two bedroom and 6 three bedroom houses. All units (100%) will be affordable housing; providing 7 for shared ownership & 13 for rent. 35 car parking spaces are to be included.
Indicative site layout from BM3 Architects
 
The next Planning Committee hearing will take place on May 21st 2020.
 
Words by Stephen Giles.
Artists Impressions from: BM3 Architects/ D5 Architects/ Hodson Architects/ Whittam Cox Architects & OMI Architects.

INSTAGRAM: @ITSYOURBIRMINGHAM 

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30 passion points
Green open spaces
06 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Memorials in Cannon Hill Park

There is at least three memorials now in Cannon Hill Park. Including the Boer War Memorial, also the Boy Scouts War Memorial (of 1924) near the Nature Centre. And more recently the memorial to the Sousse and Bardo Terrorist Attacks (which happened in 2015). This was unveiled by Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex in March 2019.

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Memorials in Cannon Hill Park





There is at least three memorials now in Cannon Hill Park. Including the Boer War Memorial, also the Boy Scouts War Memorial (of 1924) near the Nature Centre. And more recently the memorial to the Sousse and Bardo Terrorist Attacks (which happened in 2015). This was unveiled by Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex in March 2019.


Did you know that Cannon Hill Park has three memorials within the park?

The oldest of the three was the Boer War Memorial, which is now Grade II* listed. It was sculpted by Albert Toft. It was installed in 1906. The Boer War was fought in South Africa from 1899-1902 (Joseph Chamberlain was the Minister at the time that this war broke out).

The second oldest is the Boy Scouts War Memorial, on Queens Drive, on the footpath towards the Birmingham Nature Centre. It is Grade II listed and dates to 1924 in memory of local Boy Scouts who lost their lives in the First World War. The sculptor was William Haywood. It was later modified to remember those lives lost during the Second World War.

The most recent memorial sculpture is called Infinite Wave and was unveiled in March 2019 by HRH the Duke of Sussex (Prince Harry) in memory of the victims of the 2015 Sousse and Bardo Terrorist Attacks. It was designed by George King Architects.

 

Boer War Memorial

The Second Boer War was fought between 1899 and 1902 between the British Empire and two independent Boer states over the Empire's influence in South Africa. At the time Birmingham's own Joseph Chamberlain was the British Colonial Secretary. The Boer War Memorial was proposed to be in either Old Square or on Corporation Street in the City Centre but this was rejected in favour of Cannon Hill Park. This decision was taken in 1904. The memorial was designed by Albert Toft and unveiled in 1906. It was cleaned and repaired in 2012. It is now Grade II* listed.

The following photos below were taken in May 2009 on my then mobile phone camera, so the bronze was looking quite green at the time.

There was a cannon at the front.

Names of the soldiers around the sides.

And at the back of the plinth.

This side has a bronze plaque inscribed "TO  THE GLORIOUS MEMORY OF THE  SONS OF BIRMINGHAM  WHO FELL IN THE SOUTH AFRICAN WAR 1899-1902  AND TO PERPETUATE  THE EXAMPLE OF ALL WHO  SERVED IN THE WAR THIS MEMORIAL IS ERECTED BY THEIR FELLOW CITIZENS" .

By November 2009, I took my first bridge camera for a photo session around Cannon Hill Park, and that meant getting new photos of the Boer War Memorial (to try and improve on the mobile shots from the previous Spring). This was the approach from the back.

A close up of the statue. There is a large figure of a woman in the middle. Then a pair of male soldiers either side of a cannon.

Further back towards the Boer War Memorial. The flower beds didn't have much in them at this point.

The statue was surrounded by all these benches and bins. People who sit here, probably don't even realise what this memorial is for or represents. As not many people know about the Boer War (compared to WW1 and WW2).

The first of three plaques with the names of fallen Birmingham soldiers from the Boer War (1899-1902).

The second names plaque.

And the third names plaque.

I have been back to Cannon Hill Park many times over the years since, but not got new photos of the Boer War Memorial, even after it was restored (wasn't thinking about it).

Boy Scouts War Memorial

Queen's Ride is the road / path near Cannon Hill Park, and part of it is now the public car park of the park. Beyond the bollards is this war memorial on the walk towards the entrance of what was the Birmingham Nature Centre (now Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Centre). The Boy Scouts War Memorial has been Grade II listed since 2016. It was unveiled on the 27th July 1924 in memory of the local Boy Scouts who lost their lives during the First World War. The obelisk was designed by local Birmingham architect William Hayward (1877-1957). The memorial was conserved in 2012 by the Birmingham Museums Trust and Birmingham City Council.

The following photos were taken in December 2010 when there was a light dusting of snow on the ground.

Close up of the Boy Scouts War Memorial. Behind you can see the bollards on the Queen's Ride (car park behind). Queen's Ride was laid out in 1897 as a riding track, and later modified in 1920 when an avenue of trees was planted to commemorate the fallen Scouts.

This view of the Boy Scouts War Memorial towards the trees that line the path towards the Pershore Road.

In the late Victorian period, it is possible that people rode their horses and carts down here, but these days it's most likely to be cyclists on their bikes. The only cars at this end (or vans) from the Council groundsmen who maintain the park. This way to the entrance of the Nature Centre.

Was a couple of poppy wreaths at the base of the obelisk. From the Scouts. I would assume they were laid in early November 2010.

I have walked this route the odd time over the years. In the summer there is always colourful flowers planted around the Boy Scouts War Memorial. This was in July 2013.

More of the same in August 2014, red flowers, pink flowers and white flowers all the way around the obelisk.

In July 2018 there was mostly red flowers around the obelisk. You can tell that the memorial had been restored / cleaned up compared to my earlier photos. You can even see a smiley face on this side!

Infinite Wave

Birmingham's Cannon Hill Park was chosen to be the location of the Sousee and Bardo Memorial. It is a monument to the 31 British Nationals who lost their lives in two terrorists attacks in Tunisia in 2015. The project was commissioned by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. It was unveiled in March 2019 by Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex at a ceremony attended by over 300 guests. The architect was George King Architects.

I initially got photos of it in late February 2019, but was still barriers around it. I later came back for a proper look at it during late May 2019.

As you can see at the end of February 2019, Infinite Wave was almost complete but was barriers around it.

This was a few days before Prince Harry travelled to Birmingham to unveiled the memorial.

I couldn't get too close as the barriers were also near the main path in the park, but I would return near the end of the Spring for some updates.

I popped back to Cannon Hill Park near the end of May 2019 for a full look at the Sousse Memorial. Now known as Infinite Wave.

There is a path that leads up to the memorial sculpture.

Like with the other memorials in the park, there was this metal memorial plaque listing the naems of the victims of the Sousse and Bardo Terrorist Attacks.

Now time to walk around the wavey sculpture.

It meant going off the path and onto the grass.

It looks a bit like a spring, or one of those toys that you can push down the stairs, or between your hands.

It forms 31 individual streams, one for each victim who lost their lives in the attacks.

There is an area in the middle that visitors can stand in and admire the memorial.

Young children would probably run around in circles and have fun.

It pretty much looks the same on the other side.

I wonder if when the pandemic ends, if the Government would consider having a memorial here for those lost to the virus? What kind of memorial would you like to see in Cannon Hill Park for that?

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at over 1,130 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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70 passion points
Art, culture & creativity
06 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Public, West Bromwich - the lost public arts venue in Sandwell

The Public was a free public arts venue in West Bromwich in the Metropolitan Borough of Sandwell. It was this big modern pink building with unique art installations inside. I once caught the Midland Metro to West Bromwich in April 2011 to visit it. But it closed down years later and is now Central Sixth, West Bromwich. The Public opened in 2009 and closed in 2013.

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The Public, West Bromwich - the lost public arts venue in Sandwell





The Public was a free public arts venue in West Bromwich in the Metropolitan Borough of Sandwell. It was this big modern pink building with unique art installations inside. I once caught the Midland Metro to West Bromwich in April 2011 to visit it. But it closed down years later and is now Central Sixth, West Bromwich. The Public opened in 2009 and closed in 2013.


The Public, West Bromwich

The Public was a multi-purpose venue and art gallery in West Bromwich, it opened in 2009 and closed by November 2013. The architect was Will Alsop. Construction started in 2003 and was completed in 2009. Although it partially opened in 2008. It was fully completed on all levels in 2010. It was a free art gallery. Various artists had their work displayed here.

My visit to The Public was at the beginning of April 2011, and had no issues taking photos inside of the building. It was the only time I ever went inside. As by the time came back to West Bromwich years later, it was now Central Sixth, West Bromwich (a Sixth Form College from Sandwell College). But there was also the Sandwell Arts Cafe (but the automatic doors were closed when I went past in 2017). Apparently the Sixth Form College merged with my old Sixth Form College (Cadbury College) in 2018 and the campus in West Bromwich is now known as Saint Michaels Sixth Form.

 

Panoramic of The Public during April 2011, taken from New Street / Cronehills Linkway. This would become part of New Square by 2013.

Posters in the corner window including The Pink Floyd Show.

LOVE ART

Welcome to THE PUBLIC ENTRANCE FREE

Gift shop - the lighting was pink all over.

Content Pools by Lia & Miguel Carvalhais.

This was also part of the Content Pools artwork. The light bubbles went all over these things.

Flypad

Wasn't sure at the time what you were supposed to do with Flypad. I would guess step on the square and touch Play on the touch screen.

Local art exhibit. Looks like artists had created giant insects.

Back down to the ground floor after getting a lift back down. Neon pink lights on the ceiling, curvy waves on the floor.

Some kind of pink object I saw on the ground floor. The sculpture looked like it was made of tangled ropes.

Out to the square at the back of The Public with these interesting looking shiny metal parts of the building.

I would guess that there had been nothing like this in West Bromwich before or since.

Entrance to The Public on the left. I would never go back in there ever again.

The New Square shopping development would be built in 2012 and 2013 and would be in the area where those cars were in the distance.

I went back to West Bromwich in July 2017 on The Big Sleuth bear hunt. After the bus from Bearwood / Warley I went to Dudley. And the next bus to West Bromwich for the last of the bears I wanted to see. By this point New Square had opened, and The Public was now Central Sixth West Bromwich.

This Big Sleuth bear was called Picnic Time For Teddy Bears by the artist Cathy Simpson and the sponsor was The West Brom.

This was now the Main Entrance to the Sandwell Arts Cafe, as well as to the Sixth Form College.

It's a shame that The Public had to close to be replaced by Central Sixth. At the time it still looked "arty" with "imagine" and "create". In the Fab Lab.

I last got the West Midlands Metro to West Bromwich Central in August 2019 to see the new Three Degrees statue in New Square (called The Celebration). So didn't get new photos of the former Public building. I did briefly pop into the square behind but was a dead end, then headed to Dartmouth Park for another look around, before catching a tram back into Birmingham. The shops and eateries here are near Queen's Square.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at more than 1,130 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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50 passion points
Construction & regeneration
06 May 2020 - Stephen Giles
Gallery

The Construction of The Mercian - May 2020

Work is well underway on the facade installation, and it's looking good! The core has now reached level 15, with the 14-storey shoulder very close to topping out, with all floors edging upwards on a daily basis and showing its impressive bulk!

Another superb picture update from Daniel, Reiss and our legion of passionate contributors.

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The Construction of The Mercian - May 2020





Work is well underway on the facade installation, and it's looking good! The core has now reached level 15, with the 14-storey shoulder very close to topping out, with all floors edging upwards on a daily basis and showing its impressive bulk!

Another superb picture update from Daniel, Reiss and our legion of passionate contributors.


May 4th: Moda Timelapse Webcam

The big news this month is of course, the installation of the facade. Interestingly, the side facade on the shoulder element (facing camera) will see all solid panels; this is to avoid overlooking onto the upcoming 211 Broad Street slender skyscraper development - which can be viewed here

Enjoy this late March to present day update from Daniel and Reiss, with positive contributions from others. 

LATEST: May 3rd & 4th

John Gilbert

Photos by Reiss Gordon-Henry

29th April:

Photos by Daniel Sturley

27th April:

Photos by Reiss Gordon-Henry

April 23rd:

SteveOC

April 20th:

April 17th:

April 12th:

April 12th:

April 9th:

April 8th:

April 7th:

April 4th:

March 26th:

March 20th:

Photos by Daniel Sturley; Many more photos in the Full Gallery

PROJECT OVERVIEW: THE MERCIAN
The Mercian is a 42-storey (132m) skyscraper at the heart of Broad Street, in Birmingham. The building comprises of a 3-storey podium space, with a 200-metre running track, 35,000 sq ft of retail and leisure space and 30,000 sq ft of other communal facilities. On top of the podium are two cores - one for a 39-storey tower, with the other seeing a 14-storey shoulder - totaling 481 one, two and three bedroom apartments, all exclusively for rent.
 
PROJECT TEAM:
DEVELOPMENT PARTNERS: Moda Living/ Apache Capital
FUNDING: Harrison Street/ NFU Mutual/ Goldman Sachs
ARCHITECTS: Glenn Howells Architects/ Oobe Landscape
INTERIORS: Naomi Cleaver
PRINCIPAL CONTRACTOR: John Sisk & Son

PLANNING CONSULTANT: Turley Planning
 

Artists Impression from Glenn Howells Architects

Words by Stephen GilesBe sure to follow us on Instagram: @Itsyourbirmingham

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