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Green open spaces
10 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Trittiford Mill Pool in the Shire Country Park

There is many satellite parks within the Shire Country Park. One of the most popular for walks or cycle rides is the Trittiford Mill Pool in Yardley Wood. Trittiford Park has been built up since the late 1920s. The pool is fed by a millrace cut from the River Cole approx 20 yards south of Slade Lane. The park covers 15.34 acres of which 8 acres is covered by the pool itself.

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The Trittiford Mill Pool in the Shire Country Park





There is many satellite parks within the Shire Country Park. One of the most popular for walks or cycle rides is the Trittiford Mill Pool in Yardley Wood. Trittiford Park has been built up since the late 1920s. The pool is fed by a millrace cut from the River Cole approx 20 yards south of Slade Lane. The park covers 15.34 acres of which 8 acres is covered by the pool itself.


Trittiford Mill Pool, Shire Country Park

The Shire Country Park covers a four mile section of the River Cole Valley, Chinn Brook Valley, Moseley Bog and other satellite parks. The unique landscape is managed by the Birmingham Park Ranger Service and other local volunteers.

The parkland around Trittiford Park has been developed since the late 1920s. The River Cole nearby feeds the pool via a millrace close to Slade Lane. It is part of a vital chain of habitats that runs along the Cole Valley and is a S.I.N.C. Site of importance to Nature Conservation.

The Trittiford Mill Pool was created to supply water to Titterford Mill, which is known to have existed since 1779. The mill used to be at Trittiford Road where there are now buildings at Mill Gardens. The mill was advertised in 1784 as a new water corn mill. By the mid 19th century a steam engine was added. The mill was demolished after a fire in 1926.

The pool is home to a variety of wetland wildlife, including the Moorhen, Mute Swan, Black-Headed Gull and Pochard. Grey Heron can be regularly seen here.

Beyond the Trittiford Mill Pool to the south is the Scribers Lane Site of importance to Nature Conservation (usually just called Scribers Lane). The Dingles is to the north, and Chinn Brook Meadows to the west. It is in Yardley Wood.

The parkland is surrounded by Highfield Road to the north, Priory Road to the west, and Scribers Lane to the south.

I have been visiting the Trittiford Mill Pool multiple times over the years starting on Christmas Day 2013.

2013

Early on the morning of the 25th December 2013, sometime after 10am in the morning, we went for our first walk around the Trittiford Mill Pool.

Approaching the mill pool from the entrance near Highfield Road and Priory Road in Yardley Wood.

It was quite early in the morning so was a lot of bright sunlight over the mill pool.

Saw a Coot swimming in the mill pool.

The tarmac path was a bit old at this point. It would be replaced in the years to come.

This was still quite near the beginning of the walk around the pool in a clockwise direction.

Most trees without leaves apart from the evergreen ones.

The trees made nice reflections in the pool.

Sunlight was still a bit too bright.

Now saw a gull in the pool.

Swans and ducks.

Lots of gulls perched on this branch in the mill pool.

Quite a lot of Canada Geese here.

A lady in a Christmas hat as they fed the swans, geese and ducks. Was a lot of "Merry Christmas" greetings around the pool that morning.

All the swans, geese and ducks on the bank of the pool as they were eating bread. Please do not feed the birds bread. It is not good for them.

More Canada Geese and gulls around.

At the end of the fist walk, the way in or out near the bollards from Priory Road.

One of the signs that Welcomes you to the Shire Country Park and the Trittiford Mill Pool. It appears to be in the Selly Oak District at the time.

2016

The second walk into the Trittiford Mill Pool was during May 2016. It was the May Day Bank Holiday walk in the Shire Country Park, starting at the Sarehole Mill car park via John Morris Jones Walkway, The Dingles, Trittiford Mill Pool and Scribers Lane and back. At the time the Council was having new paths and wooden fences installed.

A new wooden fence near the new path. At a section where water from the River Cole goes into the Mill Pool.

There was containers with graffiti on them and bags of building materials.

The grass was looking like they had just relaid it or something.

Fresh new tarmac paths to walk over the new bridge.

Another Coot in the mill pool.

First time seeing a Great Cormorant, perched on a tree branch.

Near the end of the Mill Pool a new footbridge going over the link from the pool into the River Cole.

Beyond here, the River Cole splits into two as it goes into the Scribers Lane S.I.N.C. area.

Back in the Trittiford Mill Pool saw this Greylag Goose.

More Greylag Geese plus Canada Geese and some ducks.

Another walk in December 2016. The new footpaths were now complete. Nearby is a small field where horse riders can go around with their horses. This area is off Brookwood Avenue in Yardley Wood.

Wasn't much leaves on the trees, so could see a lady riding her horse around.

This time I spotted a Little Egret perched on a branch.

The usual Canada Geese swimming around the mill pool.

A gull in flight and other gulls around. One also perched at the bottom of a branch.

2017

The snow of December 2017. This was during the none stop snowfall of the 10th December 2017. Was was so cold and freezing that day!

Snow on the River Cole as I approached the Mill Pool from Highfield Road.

A winter wonderland in Yardley Wood.

Even the fingerpost was covered in snow. Directions to The Dingles and Scribers Lane.

Snow every where, only a quick look, as the snow was so thick.

Still there was some people around the mill pool.

Saw this dog near the mill pool which was frozen over.

There were birds in the pool but was a bit hard to see in these blizzard conditions at the time.

This was the only time I've seen this area covered in snow.

There's not been December snowfall since.

2020

My first lockdown through here was in March 2020 as social distancing measures had started. Got on from Scribers Lane near the River Cole.

Shadows on the footbridge as I only did half of the mill pool this time around.

Was a blue sky, trees hadn't quite yet regrown their leaves.

Saw another Little Egret as I headed towards the main part of the Mill Pool.

Lots of people ahead, hopefully socially distancing. It was on the 26th March 2020, so people were still getting used to the lockdown restrictions at the time.

Saw an island in the middle of the lake where the birds usually are.

Quite a lot of ducks and Canada Geese close to the path. People walking their dogs, people having a walk. Some sitting on benches.

I think some ducks were flying over the mill pool there.

This swan made a nice reflection in the mill pool.

A man in blue running ahead of me, he would next go into The Dingles, as would I. Although he went well ahead of me at the time.

Another walk around in May 2020. Starting from the Priory Road entrance. We walked half way around the Mill Pool, then into the Scribers Lane S.I.N.C. before completing the second half, and exiting at Priory Road.

Saw a few people going around on their bikes.

Seagulls perched on branches.

Saw a Coot with her baby Coots. Look how cut they were!

There was also a Coot nest nearby.

Later after coming back from Scribers Lane, back on the path towards Priory Road, as other people walked ahead. If we got close, we went onto the grass, trying to be 2 metres apart from them (if possible).

I also saw this black Great Cormorant perched on a branch.

Leaves on the trees fully grown back. May was a dry, hot month.

After leaving the Trittiford Mill Pool, one last look from Priory Road before going home.

More posts coming soon from the Shire Country Park, so watch this space!

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
History & heritage
09 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

A wonder round the Village at the Black Country Living Museum

In the first of my Black Country Living Museum posts, from my August 2011 visit, we take a look around the recreated Canal Village. A collection of buildings taken from all over the Black Country and rebuilt at the open air museum in Dudley, West Midlands. If Dudley can do this, why not Birmingham (rebuild old buildings on a museum site)?

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A wonder round the Village at the Black Country Living Museum





In the first of my Black Country Living Museum posts, from my August 2011 visit, we take a look around the recreated Canal Village. A collection of buildings taken from all over the Black Country and rebuilt at the open air museum in Dudley, West Midlands. If Dudley can do this, why not Birmingham (rebuild old buildings on a museum site)?


Black Country Living Museum

The museum was founded in 1975 on a site off Tipton Road in Dudley.  The first buildings moved here in 1976. A 26 acre site has since developed. With the unique conditions of living and working conditions of the mid 19th century to the early 20th century. The museum needs your help now more than ever, while they are closed during lockdown (with no income). Visit their website (link above) buy a ticket  (and use it when they reopen) or donate to help them.

 

For now, have a look back to the past with my August 2011 visit to the Black Country Living Museum.

Take the tram ride to the village: Trams at the Black Country Living Museum, then get off and explore the village with me.

 

Welcome to Old Birmingham Road. On the left is Hobbs & Sons Restaurant, where you can queue for some traditional fish & chips. There are further shops to the right.

Also known as Hobbs Fish & Chips Shop. It was originally at 41-42 Hall Street, Dudley, being moved and rebuilt here brick by brick where it forms the centrepiece of a 1930's High Street.

Next up is H. Morrall. MensWear Specialist. Harry Morrall’s shop used to be on Hall Street, Dudley, where he traded from 1928 to 1935. He stocked traditional men's clothes such as shirts, collars, hats, ties, socks and more. The shop reflects the fashion of the time.

Next up was Humphrey Bros. and A. Harthill Motorcycles. Humphrey Brothers was a builders’ merchants dating back to 1921 when brothers Joseph and William first traded at no 12 Birmingham Street, Oldbury. By the 1930s the business grew to include no. 14 and by the 1940s out of no 16. as well. Passageway in the middle to the Show Room.

Now a close up look at A. Harthill Motorcycles. In the late 1930s this shop was formerly part of the Humphrey brothers’ business (now recreated next door). At the Museum it has been fitted out as Hartills motor cycle shop, which was located in Mount Pleasant, Bilston. The shop was opened in 1937 by Abraham Hartill, who moved from a smaller unit in the same block. He mostly sold second hand motorcycles.

Now in The Village Centre. We find Gregory’s General Store on the left. It stands next to the Canal Street Bridge. The shop was built as a pair of houses, and Mrs Gregory started selling goods from one of the front rooms. Were major alterations in 1923. Almost everything that the local community needed was stocked in and around Lawrence Lane at the shop. The shop was originally built as a pair of houses in 1883 at Lawrence Lane, Oldhill by Charles Gregory, an ironworker. The house in the middle was The Chainmaker's House and H. Emile Doo Chemist & Druggist was at the far end to the right.

We are now inside of The Chainmaker’s House. It used to be next to Gregory’s Stores in Lawrence Lane, Old Hill. It was the first house to be rebuilt at the museum. It was built in 1886 as a washhouse, known locally as a coalhouse. The interior has been displayed to reflect the home of a late Victorian chainmaker of 1914. In the kitchen to the back of the house was a cast iron cooker / stove.

Next up was H. Emile Doo Chemist & Druggist. The shop was a replica of Mr Harold Emile Doo’s shop in Halesowen Road, Netherton. The shop front was original, acquired when the premises was modernised in 1979. The fittings are of the 1920's, were donated by the Doo family (no they are not related to Scooby Doo!). There was a photographers studio inside.

A look inside of the chemist shop. There was a fascinating range of early twentieth century cosmetics, displayed in the original mahogany cabinets. There was a demonstrator who told you all about the equipment and strange ingredients used by the chemists' to treat all sorts of complaints.

At the end of the street was this pub the Bottle & Glass Inn. The inn was originally located at Brierley Hill Road, Brockmore, close to the canal with the Stourbridge Flight of 16 locks. In the 1820s the pub was known as the Bush public house, but by the 1840s it was known as the Bottle and Glass. Phillip Hamish MacDonald Wood was the Licenced Victualler.

Down here was the Station Road Cottages and the Ironmonger's Shop. The cottages were displayed as they may have been around 1910, when two branches of the Newton family lived in them. The two cottages are replicas of a pair that stood on Station Road, Oldhill, probably built in 1848. And are typical workers houses of the late 18th and early 19th century in the Black Country. Nash’s ironmongery opened in 1860 in Oldbury, supplying both domestic ironmongery and works trade. The shop had been recreated as it would have been in the 1930s on Pipers Row. It is now on the right hand corner of Canal Street.

A closer look at the Station Road Cottages. The left hand cottage was expanded in the 1860s. And the right hand cottage at the turn of the 19th century. Edward Newton lived in the cottage to the left with his wife and family. He was described as a ‘coal heaver’. His brother Thomas was a nail maker and lived in the cottage to the right. His wife ran a sweetshop from the front room, which is now part of the Cobbler's Shop. The Canalside Cafe was to the left of here.

Next up was the Back to Back Houses on Brook Street. The three Brook Street houses were originally built in  Sedgley. The cottages are in the period of 1924. At no. 11 was WW1 veteran, who was a an employee of the adjacent brass foundry. No. 12 was occupied by a couple whose children had grown up and moved into their own homes elsewhere. The final house was occupied by a man described as an art metal worker. Was much better off financially. Brook Street had gas installed in the houses with gas cookers in the kitchens, and gas lights.

St James's School was on Old Birmingham Road. The school was originally built on Salop Street in Dudley in 1842 near St James Church. The architect was William Bourne of Dudley. It could accommodate 300 children. It was moved to the museum in 1991, with funds provided by the Charles Hayward Trust. Today it is displayed as is it was in 1912. Despite the conditions of the building, it continued to be used as a school until 1980. The head teacher was Mrs. T. Griffiths. Built in 1842, an extension was built in 1845. Hot water and heating installed by the 1890's. The school was renovated in the 1930's. American forces stationed in Dudley from 1940 - 45 were based in this building during WW2. The school was converted into a community centre in 1980, but by 1989 it was structurally unsafe. All this changed when it moved to the museum in 1991.

Finally we have The Workers' Institute. It originally came from Cradley Heath. It was a landmark of the achievments of British labour history. The interior is set as it was in 1935. Upstairs was a memorial to Mary Macarthur, one of Britain’s greatest union leaders. She stood as the first Labour Party candidate for Stourbridge in 1918. Inside was a 300 seat auditorium which hosts costumed performances, living history theatre, education and entertainment activities.

A look in one of the rooms in The Workers' Institute. A woman staff member talks to a lady on the other desk. Also has the old style telephone. Their was a Royal typewriter on this desk.

I hope you have enjoyed this tour of the village at the Black Country Living Museum.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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50 passion points
Civic pride
09 Jun 2020 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

Birmingham, Cathedral Square (Pigeon Park) - 17th May 2020

A small photographic study of the lush looking grounds of Cathedral Square, known locally as 'Pigeon Park', on a cloudy day in May.

Photos by Daniel Sturley

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Birmingham, Cathedral Square (Pigeon Park) - 17th May 2020





A small photographic study of the lush looking grounds of Cathedral Square, known locally as 'Pigeon Park', on a cloudy day in May.

Photos by Daniel Sturley


A tense moment as the pigeons explain that they are not sharing.

Photos by Daniel Sturley

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70 passion points
Civic pride
08 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

The statue of Queen Victoria in Victoria Square

The original marble statue of Queen Victoria was unveiled in Victoria Square on the 10th January 1901 (12 days before her death). It was sculpted by Thomas Brock. The statue had to be replaced with a bronze casting in 1951 by the sculptor William Bloye. In 2011 a new bronze sceptre was installed. And the statue was conserved in 2018 by the Birmingham Civic Society.

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The statue of Queen Victoria in Victoria Square





The original marble statue of Queen Victoria was unveiled in Victoria Square on the 10th January 1901 (12 days before her death). It was sculpted by Thomas Brock. The statue had to be replaced with a bronze casting in 1951 by the sculptor William Bloye. In 2011 a new bronze sceptre was installed. And the statue was conserved in 2018 by the Birmingham Civic Society.


The Statue of Queen Victoria, Victoria Square, Birmingham

In 2018 the Birmingham Civic Society gave the statue of Queen Victoria a deep clean, which saw scaffolding go up around April 2018. By May 2018 it was looking as good as new. Back in 2011 a new bronze sceptre was installed to replace the long missing one.

The PMSA has a detailed description of the history of the statue, now preserved on the Web Archive.

Mr W. H. Barber who was a Birmingham solicitor and benefactor of the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, offered to present the first outdoor statue of Queen Victoria to Birmingham in 1897, during the Diamond Jubilee year. He considered Thomas Brock to be the most suitable sculptor. Barber insisted that it be an enlarged replica of Brock's statue at Worcester Hall. The City accepted the offer on the 27th July 1897 and the completed work was unveiled 12 days before the death of Queen Victoria, on the 10th January 1901. It was in an outside space original named Council House Square, renamed to Victoria Square.

The original statue was made of white marble standing on a pedestal of dark Cornish granite. The figure of the Queen made more monumental with long state robes. The statue remained here, at one point statues of John Skirrow Wright and Joseph Priestley were here until 1913. Only to be replaced by the statue of King Edward VII.

During the VE Day celebrations on the 8th May 1945, there were men sitting on top of the statue, and the orb was badly damaged. The statue remained in place until 1950.

The square was redesigned in 1950 as a permanent work marking the Festival of Britain in 1951. The statue of King Edward VII was moved to Highgate Park, and as the marble original of Queen Victoria had weathered badly, Birmingham City Council and the Birmingham Civic Society provided a grant towards reproducing it in bronze.

The old statue was removed from Victoria Square on the 13th March 1950, and it was renovated by William Bloye who cast it in bronze. It returned on the 25th May 1951 and erected on a pedestal of light coloured Cornish granite. It was unveiled on the 9th June 1951 by the Princess Elizabeth (now our current Queen from 6th February 1952 to present).

In 1993 Victoria Square was pedestrianised and included new sculptures by Dhruva Mistry and Antony Gormley. The statue of Queen Victoria was moved slightly at the time. The square was re-opened by the Princess of Wales on the 6th May 1993.

More recently, the Birmingham Civic Society had a new bronze Sceptre made, to replace the one long since missing, this was done in February 2011. Scaffolding went up around the statue in late April 2018 for a deep clean. By the following month it was looking as good as new. New paving continues to be installed around Victoria Square, this started in 2019 as Town Hall Tram Stop was opened on Paradise Street, and continues well into 2020.

 

2009

My first photos of the statue of Queen Victoria were taken in April 2009, when I started going around Birmingham with my then Fujifilm compact camera. The brilliant blue sky going into Chamberain Square behind.

As you can see the tip of the Sceptre was missing. It would be replaced for another two years.

Some views of the statue taken during August 2009. By then I had my first Fujifilm bridge camera. So got some new photos of Queen Victoria.

Close up and you still see that the tip of the Sceptre was missing.

The statue always works quite well with the late 19th Century Council House architecture.

During the Birmingham Frankfurt Christmas Market, in November 2009, you could see the statue of Queen Victoria to the left of a Helter Skelter ride.

In this view of the statue you can see the original 103 Colmore Row which was designed by John Madin (now being replaced). It was built from 1973 and opened in 1976. It was demolished in 2016. Was known as National Westminster House.

There was also a carrousel to the right, which returns to Victoria Square every Christmas season with the BFCM.

2011

The tip of the Sceptre was replaced by February 2011, completing the statue as it was originally meant to look.

But the bronze was looking a bit weathered even back in 2011.

The Forward flag was flying on the top of the Town Hall, as you can see Queen Victoria holding her Orb.

From the back you can hardly tell that the tip of the Sceptre was brand new!

2013

Probably the only time I've seen the statue of Queen Victoria covered in snow was back in January 2013. This was the snowfall on the 18th January 2013. It was so cold and the snow was falling!

In September 2013 was 4 Squares Weekender. This was held over the weekend of the 6th to 8th September 2013. Members of Nofit State Circus were standing on the roof of a caravan. There was flags and buntings all over the square at the time.

I wonder if the Queen was amused or not? It was the weekend celebrating the opening of the Library of Birmingham.

2015

Now onto December 2015 with the Birmingham Frankfurt Christmas Market again. To the right of the statue of Queen Victoria was a pair of portacabins, with the top one saying Merry Christmas! Heart 100.7.

Behind all the huts of the BFCM was the annual Happy Christmas Birmingham lit up on the Council House. With it's line of lions above.

2017

Seen on Remembrance Sunday in Victoria Square during November 2017. It was on the 12th November 2017 as a crowd gathered around Birmingham's Cenotaph at the time in front of the Council House. As the then Lord Mayor of Birmingham led the Service of Remembrance (this was moved to Colmore Row / Cathedral Square in 2018 and 2019).

2018

The view from January 2018, as Queen Victoria has a new backing into Chamberlain Square with the then being built One Chamberlain Square. It was heavily raining at the time. This was around the time that Carillion went into liquidation (and would be months before BAM took over).

In April 2018, Birmingham was celebrating the end of the 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast in Australia, while looking forward to the games in Birmingham in 2022. Birmingham was being broadcast live to the world at the time, as big performance took place in the square. A couple of 2022 flags to the right of the statue of Queen Victoria.

A few weeks later, scaffolding went up around the statue for it's deep clean. The statue goes well with the columns of the Town Hall, and you can see One Chamberlain Square to the right through the columns.

A few days after the scaffolding got a bit of a roof. The Birmingham Civic Society had the statue given a deep clean. It would look as good as new the next time I saw it.

Wow! What a result! By May 2018 the statue of Queen Victoria was looking amazing after the conservation work that took place the month before. Crane to the left at Paradise Birmingham. BAM had taken over One Chamberlain Square and started Two Chamberlain Square by this point in time.

It is now July 2018. New steps had been built around the base of the statue of Queen Victoria, while the hoardings of the West Midlands Metro extension were in front of her.

I also saw this view down Pinfold Street at the time towards Birmingham New Street Station. A contrast between modern architecture and Victorian architecture. With Victoria Square House to the right.

During August 2018, I got this view of the Town Hall, One Chamberlain Square, the Queen Victoria statue and the Council House in one shot.

Now pink and blue adverts on the West Midlands Metro extension hoardings in October 2018. Was temporary tarmac around the new steps. Victoria Square House directly in front of the Queen and No. 1 Victoria Square to the right. The Beetham Tower is seen down Hill Street.

In November 2018, I was in the Banqueting Suite at the Council House for the first Annual Birmingham We Are event that I attended. And got this view of the statue of Queen Victoria, facing the construction site of the West Midlands Metro extension. Lots of temporary tarmac around, as the Birmingham Frankfurt Christmas Market would soon be back again.

2019

I got this view in February 2019 of the Queen Victoria statue. With the Town Hall, Chamberlain Memorial and One Chamberlain Square behind. The view behind has changed quite a lot in 10 years!

There was a temporary guest in Victoria Square during May 2019, the Knife Angel. Queen Victoria shining to the left. While you can also see the Town Hall, Two Chamberlain Square, the Chamberlain Memorial and One Chamberlain Square. I'd previously seen the Knife Angel in Coventry in March 2019. It was by Alfie Bradley. It was still on a Nationwide tour when the pandemic and lockdown hit in 2020. (Click the link above to check out my Knife Angel post).

2020

The Birmingham We Are annual event took place once again at the Banqueting Suite in the Council House in January 2020 (delayed from December 2019 due to the General Election). Here you can see West Midlands Metro tram 20 passing the statue of Queen Victoria.

Town Hall Tram Stop opened in December 2019 and there was now regular tram services to Library Tram Stop in Centenary Square. Meanwhile some of the paving around Victoria Square was complete, but was a lot left to do. This is unique with a blue tram going past the statue.

In early February 2020, I was walking around Paradise Circus Queensway, when I saw this view towards Victoria Square House down what used to be Congreve Passage, and would could be Congreve Street again in the future.

Zooming in through the gate, I got this view of the Queen Victoria statue between Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery / The Council House and Victoria Square House. The shiny new Birmingham New Street Station is just about visible between the two Victorian buildings. Hopefully one day in the future it will be possible to walk from this direction into Chamberlain Square and Victoria Square. It's been blocked off since 2015.

About 5 days later in Victoria Square, and the new steps with rails, which was completed by the end of 2019, when Town Hall Tram Stop opened. A safer way to head up to the statue of Queen Victoria. This was my last close up photo of the statue before the pandemic / lockdown was declared in late March 2020. I have got one photo of the Council House from early March 2020, but it's not directly at the statue.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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50 passion points
People & community
05 Jun 2020 - Stephen Giles
Gallery

#BLMBIRMINGHAM

Stand up Birmingham! Thousands peacefully gathered in the city yesterday from all different communities and backgrounds to show solidarity with those fighting for justice and black lives everywhere.

#BLMBirmingham

 

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#BLMBIRMINGHAM





Stand up Birmingham! Thousands peacefully gathered in the city yesterday from all different communities and backgrounds to show solidarity with those fighting for justice and black lives everywhere.

#BLMBirmingham

 


Reiss Gordon-Henry (IG: ReissOmari)

Websites: Black Lives Matter UKGeorge Floyd Memorial Fund/ UKBLM Fund/ Belly Mujinga Fund/ Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust/ Queer Black YP Fund.

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50 passion points

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