It's not just Blakesley Hall that you can visit in Yardley. If you get the 11A or 11C to Stoney Lane, get off the bus, and take the short walk to Old Yardley Village. Here you will find St Edburgha's Church, the Parish Church of Yardley, as well as The Trust School, a timber framed building, with the school dating to medieval times. Various period houses surround the churchyard.

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Old Yardley Village: a hidden gem not far from Blakesley Hall





It's not just Blakesley Hall that you can visit in Yardley. If you get the 11A or 11C to Stoney Lane, get off the bus, and take the short walk to Old Yardley Village. Here you will find St Edburgha's Church, the Parish Church of Yardley, as well as The Trust School, a timber framed building, with the school dating to medieval times. Various period houses surround the churchyard.


Old Yardley Village is located in the east of Birmingham. It is to the north east of South Yardley and the Coventry Road. Stechford is to the north beyond the village. The heart of the village is St Edburgha's Church. These photos were taken in the winter of 2009 / 2010, and were taken in January 2010. I have been back to the area since, popping into Old Yardley Park. Just my snowy photos back then were so perfect, didn't feel the need to retake photos of the buildings in other seasons or without the snow.

The first view of St Edburgha's Church is usually from the walk up Church Road. It is a Grade I listed building and is part of the Old Yardley conservation area. One of the oldest churches in Birmingham, it dates back to at least the 13th century. Originally part of the Diocese of Lichfield it was built by Aston Church. It was named after King Alfred's granddaughter Edburgha. The majority of the building was built during the 14th and 15th centuries.

The church was made of sandstone. It has a nave, aisles, transepts and chancel. The pulpit dates to the 17th century. The west window was made by John Hardman and Company in 1892. Various monuments from the 15th to 19th centuries.

The church did look nice surrounded by snow, but it's not like that every winter, depending on if it snows or not. Would say it last got a covering of snow in March 2018 during the Beast from the East. There is a monument to Rev Dr Henry Greswolde from after 1700 in the chancel that is apparently unusual (not seen it myself).

Trees surround the church in the churchyard. The landscaped grounds of the church are grassed, I don't think that there is any graves around the church building. In spring / summer there are flower beds. Is also a selection of benches around to sit down on.

I originally did a post about the old Grammar Schools in Yardley and Kings Norton. Link to that post is here The Old Grammar Schools of Kings Norton and Yardley. But will repost those photos here with more details below.

I will expand the part about the Old Grammar School in Old Yardley here. Seen during the snow of January 2010. There is evidence of their being a school on this site since about 1260. The building probably dates to the 15th century. Originally built as a Guild Hall. The last school master was W Sutherns. The school closed in 1908 and it's now used as parish rooms. It belongs to the Yardley Parish Church.

It is a Grade II* listed building also known as The Trust School. It was formerly listed as The Old Grammar School. It is a timber-framed building with close studding. It has two storeys. Other sections have red bricks and the building has a tiled roof. As well as the Trust School, it also included no's 422 and 424 Church Road in Yardley.

This front view of the former school with a black plaque. You can also call it the Old Trust School now. Old Yardley Park has an entrance to the right of the building. The entrance to the churchyard of St Edburgha's Church is to the left.

The side view of the Trust School / Old Grammar School. Snow was covering the roof at the time. There is at least four chimneys on the roof. This view from the snow covered churchyard of St Edburgha's Church.

Seen from the churchyard of St Edburgha's Church is no's 422 and 424 Church Road. They are part of the same building as The Trust School (The Old Grammar School). No. 422 is on the far right. It's upper floors is timber framed and that was part of the school. The ground floor is painted brick. The rest of the house is to the left and dates to the 19th century, also painted brick.

No 424 is to the far left of the building. It has red brick and a tiled roof and dates to the 19th century. Two storeys. It is not as wide as no 422 to the right of it. Both 422 and 424 were the Schoolmasters House of the late 19th century. Yardley's churchyard was cleared of upright gravestones in 1959, only one remains. That of the schoolmaster James Chell in the south-east corner. Both houses are part of the same Grade II* listing as The Trust School.

The following information is taken from the Yardley Conservation Society.

First up is 390 Church Road. It was formerly a pub called The Talbot. The building is Grade II listed and dates to the 18th century. Behind the former pub is Old Yardley Park. It has painted brick with a tiled roof. Was probably used as a pub during the 19th century. It is now a private house.Since I took this in January 2010, the house has been repainted white all over. And it appears that the current owners have changed the front door. The Yardley Conservation Society (link above) says that the Trustees of the Charity Estates visited the pub to distribute dole money.

The former General Store was at 431 Church Road in Old Yardley Village until sometime during the 1960s. It's now just a private home. A Grade II listed building dating to the 18th century. Pebbledashed with an all tile roof. It is to the left of The Cottagers Institute.

Next up is a building dated to 1882. The Cottagers Institute is at 433 Church Road. It was set up by Ebenezer Hoskins of The Grange to teach gardening and industrial skills to local people. It was a meeting hall to encourage gardening and industrial work for the villagers. It was previously the site of The Ring of Bells public house. Now I think it is just a private home. When it was available to let back in 2010 it was described as Commercial Premises.

 

Penny Cottage is at 435 Church Road. Built in 1826 by the Yardley Charity Trust for a local blacksmith, John Leake. It was restored in 1980. It is a Grade II listed building. Red brick with a tiled roof. Two storeys.

Houses from 437 to 443 Church Road. These brick built houses were built in 1895 to replace six early 19th century cottages, which themselves had replaced an earlier farmhouse. Construction of them may have begun after 1894. Church Terrace is nearby.

A pair of white painted brick houses at 445 and 447 Church Road. Just beyond Church Terrace. They began life in the late 18th century as a malthouse but was converted into cottages by the 1850s. Also Grade II listed buildings. Painted brick with a tiled roof.

This barn is to the east of 451 Church Road. A Grade II listed building from the early 19th century. A reminder that this used to be a rural village surrounded by farms. It was the third barn. Red brick with a tiled roof. No 453 Church Road is phyically attached to this barn. The windows are boarded up, so I'm not sure if it's being used in a long time. All these buildings belong to the Old Yardley Village Conservation Area, so they are protected.

 

Photos taken in January 2010 by Elliott Brown.